How Swagbucks Allows Me to Earn Passive Income from Dividends

My very first post on this site more than three years ago touched on the benefits that users could earn from the site SwagBucks (you can sign up here).  The site allows users to complete a number of different tasks that earn a virtual currency known as Swagbucks. This virtual currency is not like Bitcoin in that the value can vary greatly over time. The Swagbucks pretty much have a fixed redemption value of one cent per Swagbuck. This current post is going to show you how you can cash in and start to earn passive income that could literally last for the rest of your life.

Many people who use the site cash in for things like $5 e-gift cards from retailers like Amazon or Walmart. I do not choose to use this redemption option. The coolest of all redemptions, in my estimation, is $25 in PayPal cash. I use the site to earn money in pajamas, and have been putting my PayPal cash to work earning money on the money I earned in my pajamas.

I need to get 2,500 Swagbucks to cash in on PayPal. I can earn these 2,500 Swagbucks in a variety of ways. One of the most common options is by searching on the web. I use the search bar, and the site randomly provides a number of Swagbucks that generally ranges between 4 and 50. Here is a picture of what a “win” looks like:

I scored 11 Swagbucks with this search.
I scored 11 Swagbucks with this search.

One way that I can earn more Swagbucks is through online surveys. I tend to look at the surveys under “Gold Surveys” the most, as I seem to have more luck getting them to credit. The surveys that pay out 50 Swagbucks for 10 minutes are generally from a site called Opinion Central, and I have had pretty good success from these. They generally take less than the 10 minutes advertised, as well.

I opt for the New Gold Surveys
I usually opt for the New Gold Surveys

Another major way that you can earn Swagbucks in pajamas while watching the TV is by watching videos. There are a couple of options that I’ve found that I can earn quite a few Swagbucks pretty quickly.  I frequently will watch videos by clicking on this dude who’s sitting behind a laptop:

Click on this guy to watch videos that credit on Swagbucks.
Click on this guy to watch videos that credit on Swagbucks.

After clicking on laptop guy, you will then be taken to a screen that invites you to watch the videos. You have to scroll through a few (usually between 5 and 10, although sometimes there will be an ad campaign with just one video). This usually pays out 2 Swagbucks, which is admittedly not much, but I can easily scroll through them while watching TV (this is the maximizing spare time for income, folks). Sometimes around Christmas, the process will pay out 3 Swagbucks per task. You would click through all of the videos. I set up my screen to look like this so that I know when to click the green button:

Swagbucks Videos 2

Another easy way to earn a few Swagbucks while watching TV is through nCrave videos. I like the ones that are highlighted here. I use the ones with the swirling arrow icon that’s circled in red:

Encrave Videos can help you earn some Swagbucks with little effort.
nCrave Videos can help you earn some Swagbucks with little effort.

After clicking on the nCrave video, you need to make sure that the “Discovery Mode” is toggled to the green check mark. This will let the carousel of videos play automatically. Again, you won’t get rich overnight from this process, but it’s a few Swagbucks for very little effort. They do add up over time.

Make sure the Discovery Mode is toggled on to automatically cycle through the videos.

Make sure the Discovery Mode is toggled on to automatically cycle through the videos. 

I work on several of these tasks when watching TV on a daily basis. Most months, I am able to cash in at least $25 toward PayPal cash; some months, I cash out $50. When this cash hits my PayPal account, I can then transfer it to my linked back account and then transfer it to a brokerage account. I’ve been transferring it to Loyal3 each month. When it hits Loyal 3, I can then invest with no commission in one of the 60-some companies that this brokerage allows people to invest in. I reviewed how I use Loyal3 here.

Each PayPal cashout will allow me to get around $0.75 per year for life for each $25 I invest (when estimating a dividend yield of 3%). Over the course of the year, I will get around $10 in dividend income, give or take a few dollars, depending upon the companies invested in. This is where the concept gets pretty cool. That $10 in dividend income can then be put into additional stock, and the compounding process can begin.  The money that I earned in pajamas with Swagbucks can then go toward making its own money, which will then make more money. Over time, even if one or two companies go belly-up (I buy only companies that are paying dividends, and I invest in multiple companies to diversify my risk), I should have a pretty decent amount of income coming in on a quarterly basis. The major factor for success is persistence.  Check out this article on the power of getting just an extra dollar a day to invest.

What Are You Waiting For? 

To get the ball started, you can sign up for Swagbucks here. Please note that should you do so, I could get compensated for referring you. I only share method’s that I’ve used myself that work. I’ve earned more than $1,000 via Swagbucks since signing up, and the majority of this income has been earned by my activity, not referrals. Now the money I’m earning is earning its own passive income. Should you decide to sign up with my link, I appreciate your support. Good luck earning money in pajamas.

If you’ve learned something new from this post, be sure to sign up to follow the blog. I update it fairly frequently with the ways that I’m earning passive income.

Why You Should Always Grab Every Loyalty Point Available

I’m currently sitting in a hotel room in mid-America. Missouri to be exact. My total cost for this hotel room and the breakfast I’ll be eating tomorrow is exactly  $0. My current stay is in a Best Western hotel. All of the Best Westerns that I’ve stayed in have been clean and reasonably comfortable. It’s a decent chain by all accounts.

However, I generally stay at Marriott properties. How did I get my free night at the Best Western? From loyalty points. I earned a nice chunk about seven years ago from a stay at the Best Western Carolinian (I think that the hotel has changed hands since).  I stayed in a one-bedroom condo that week. I also stayed in a Best Western in Kentucky about six years ago and at the Best Western in Wall, SD, a couple of times (this is the city that’s home to the world famous Wall Drug).

This is not my hotel, but it is a hotel. Mine is free.
This is not my hotel, but it is a hotel. Mine is free.

All of my previous stays added up to just north of 16,000 points, so I looked for a Best Western along my route for my current trip. I found one in the city that I frequently stay at during a trip east that I take a couple of times a year for a family visit. Total cost $0. That’s hard to beat. Many people ignore the option to earn points for every stay at a hotel  chain that has a loyalty program. Even if it takes years, these programs can pay off. I had to spend the night somewhere tonight, and it’s better that it’s free.

Usually, when I stay at a Marriott property, I use the chain’s co-branded credit card from Chase. This gives me bonus points. I have no such card for Best Western, even though one is available. I don’t even intend to get this card at any time in the near future. Had I made any purchases in the sundries shop, I would have put them on my Chase Sapphire card, which earns 2 points per dollar for travel expenses. Hotel stays definitely qualify in this regard. I always try to maximize the points that I earn, because they can lead to free nights at a Best Western that’s close to very little. They can also lead to trips to Europe or Mexico that cost way less than most people would think.

How have you been able to save money through loyalty programs?  Let me know in the comments.

Please note that you can get into pretty heavy debt with credit cards. That’s why I would recommend that you avoid them if you cannot pay off all purchases on a monthly basis. 

If you enjoyed this article, and would like to keep up with new articles on travel and personal finance/earning money from home (or on the road), be sure to sign up on the right. 

May 2016 Passive Dividend Earnings

It’s again one of my favorite times of the month–the time that I get to recount my passive dividend income that rolled in over the past 30 (or so) days. The month of May is over, and I again made some money while working on my day job and while sleeping at night. My dividend income was already ahead of all of last year at the end of March. April and May have just added to this amount.

While the amount is not terribly impressive, it’s growing over time, and that’s my goal. My goal is to build up a growing stream of passive income that allows me to handle many of my expenses when I get closer to retirement. Pennies today will grow to dollars tomorrow, and then into hundreds in a few years. My current forward annual dividend income is estimated at a total of $142.90. During the month of May, I was able to earn the following dividends:

Apple (AAPL):                               $2.24

Starbucks (SBUX):                     $0.09

AT & T (T):                                      $6.85

TOTAL for May 2016              $9.18

This dividend income from May brings my annual total to $42.46, which is well above my $20.91 total for all of 2015. I’ve currently more than doubled my annual dividend income.  I earned my first dividend from Starbucks in May, and I was able to add to both my Apple and AT & T payment from February. My dividend from AT & T was reinvested into 0.175 additional shares of the telecom giant. This DRIP will add $0.34 to my annual dividend income. I did not buy any new companies in May, and I am currently invested in a total of 10 companies.

My dividends from May were $2.91 more than my payout in February. This was an increase of 46 percent in just three months. I did not have a dividend payment in May 2015, so my year-over-year increase is not available. This comparison will start to be available in August.  The growth in my passive income is really exciting. I’m looking forward to the day when I can earn hundreds every month from my recliner. How did your dividend income look for May?

Family Trip to Mexico for Less than a Grand

A couple of months ago, I wrote a report on my Trip to Europe on the Cheap.  I was pretty impressed with my use of frequent flyer miles and hotel points for that trip. I was recently just looking around the Southwest Airlines site to try and figure out how many points would be needed to some of their international destinations. I’ve flown Southwest a few times previously, but I had not yet traveled with them internationally. I’ve been to Cancun and Aruba before, and those were my first choices. I was looking at an Eastern point of departure. I only had enough Chase Ultimate Rewards points to purchase two one-way tickets. I was actually looking at going next year, so that was OK.

The Marina in Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, Mexico
The Marina in Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, Mexico (Taken by Your’s Truly with my trusty cell phone)
Entrance to the CasaMagna Marriott Resort, Puerto Vallarta (photo, again by your's truly)
Entrance to the CasaMagna Marriott Resort, Puerto Vallarta (photo, again by your’s truly)

I then lookedd at some tickets from Denver, which is relatively close to home and only a drive of a few hours. We had flown to LAX last year for around 29,000 for four tickets–total. Southwest was having a fare sale at the time, and there was another sale. LAX was now down to just more than 2,000 points for a one-way flight. I then decided to look at international destinations from DEN. Cancun and Aruba were still pretty high. I then came upon a ticket to Puerto Vallarta for 2,880 one-way for a non-stop flight. That seemed like a pretty good deal to me. I figured the return trip would be way higher. To my surprise, however, I could get a flight out on Monday and a return flight on Thursday for 5,760 Rapid rewards points total (with about $76 in taxes in addition). I made the purchase by transferring out 23,000 Ultimate Rewards Points for four tickets.

 

I also had to figure out where to stay. I started on Expedia by using one of those cheapest to most expensive sorter tools. I found a Comfort Inn and a Holiday Inn Express that  were really cheap (think around $50) and offered free breakfast. There was one downside to these hotels, however. They were were not ocean-front properties. If I’m going to a seaside town, I want to be no more than a block or two from the sand. I then found the CasaMagna Marriot Resort. It is an ocean-front property with a massive pool and beach access. I also found out that it was only $97 a night (+ tax). I was pretty much out of Marriott Rewards points because of the aforementioned trip to France, but I figured that spending 35,000 points per night for a category 7 hotel that cost only $97 a night would have been a bad redemption anyways–less than 0.28 cents a point in value. I figure that I’ll wind up with ~10,000 Marriott Rewards points for the stay altogether, not counting a 2,500 point bonus from one of Marriott’s Mega Bonus deals that are quite frequent. The reservation would also include a $30 discount at the spa, which we did not use, and a 30 percent discount at the La Estancia restaurant, which we did use. The filet at La Estancia was excellente. We also dined at the Champion’s Sports Bar, and had the privilege to watch the filming of a popular Mexican soap opera while eating one evening.

 

The room was quite comfortable, but queen beds might have been more comfortable than the doubles that we wound up using. I was supposed to be in what was considered a garden-view room, but I was a bit surprised when I walked onto the balcony to this view:

View from balcony at CasaMagna Marriott Puerto Vallarta--by me
View from balcony at CasaMagna Marriott Puerto Vallarta–by me

This was a pretty great view to wake up to, to say the least. The gardens on the property are maintained exquisitely. The food on-site was quite good. I had a massive burger one night at Champion’s one night and some grilled chicken rigatoni another, in addition to the meal at La Estancia noted above. The only thing I really did not enjoy was a chili enchilada? (at least I think that’s what it was), but the filet more than made up for it. Lunch each day was a pizza from Mango’s Deli, also on-site at CasaMagna Marriott. The view in Puerto Vallarta, with the mountains in the background, is more impressive than that in Cancun, in my opinion. The weather was great, as the rainy season is still a few weeks away.

The hotel was a wonderful property to visit, and it was not terribly crowded for the most part. Kids were few and far between (outside of mine), as school is still in session for most people. Altogether, lodging, meals, and airfare ran less than $1,000. It’s actually tough to beat this on a trip for four to many places within the US–and I was able to get some international exposure and some much-needed R&R. My hope is that I can get Southwest tickets on sale like this on a fairly regular (every other year or so) basis so that I can visit again and explore more of the city. We did little else outside of hang out at the beach and the pool other than walking to the Marina one day and riding a cab to the Malecon on another for some shopping (not my cup of tea, but mi familia loves it).

Mexican Pesos
Mexican Pesos

I do have a few bits of advice for people who are visiting PV. Make sure to exchange a few dollars for pesos upon arrival. Cabs do not appear to take credit cards, and there are many shops that do not, and those that do mostly take only Visa or MasterCard (no Amex). Also, ignore the peddlers of time shares in the airport. They act like they are the only ones who can get you a ride to the hotel, but it is way expensive (400 pesos for a trip that should have taken less than 100–other hotels could cost a bit more, but the Marriott to the Malecon was only 105 pesos, which is at 20-minute ride for ~$5), and they will push you to go through their presentation. I didn’t fall for the presentation, but did get ripped off on the ride (was told it was a refundable deposit). Just take a cab.

Currently, Southwest Airlines cards are offering a 50,000 Rapid Rewards point sign-up bonus for a $2,000 minimum spend. For those who can avoid running up interest charges for not paying off their cards on a monthly basis, this could pay off in anywhere between 2 and 8 (at the super-duper discounted rate I paid) round-trip tickets to Puerto Vallarta.

Disclaimer: I may get compensation should you click my affiliate links. Also, do not sign up for credit cards if you cannot pay off the balance on a monthly basis. Interest expenses will more than eat up any benefit you can get from the sign-up bonus you get. 

April 2016 Passive Dividend Income

Another month has come and gone. Today is the first day of May, and on this past Friday, I got my last dividend notification for the month of April. I’m now about nine months into the dividend growth investing journey. My goal is to build up passive income over time so that I can enjoy a reasonable retirement in a couple of decades. I believe that long-standing dividend payers who have solid cash flows should be reasonable investments for the long term.

I added a couple of small positions over the past month, but neither of these has paid out a dividend yet. I started pooling my dividends in my Loyal3 account in January, and I reached $10 early in April. I then immediately put that $10 to work in a very small starting position in Unilever PLC. My hope is that my growing stream of dividends will enable me to add to this small start each quarter to start with. As my core positions add more in dividend payments, I plan to increase the frequency of these purchases in UL.

I also cashed out some more funds from Swagbucks and started with a $25 position in Starbucks (SBUX). My hope is to alternate Swagbucks payments and build up some smaller positions. Starbucks does not pay a huge dividend at this point, but the company has been increasing its payout rapidly over the past few years. Additionally, the company is still in the growth phase, so I’m hoping that my eventual yield on cost is much higher than my current ~1.4 percent.

I received three dividend payments during the month of April, so without further ado, here they are:

Coca-Cola (KO):                         $2.95

Wal-Mart (WMT):                       $2.48

Bank of Nova Scotia (BNS):     $3.47

Total dividend payments for March:   $8.90

Dividend income for 2016:                      $33.28

My payment from BNS was subject to a 15 percent withholding tax, so only $2.95 went into my DRIP. This purchased another 0.057 shares of BNS, and it will add about $0.12 to my annual dividend income, although this will vary because of foreign exchange rates. I put the other dividends toward the aforementioned  purchase of Unilever. My current forward dividend income for the next 12 months should be right around $131.67 (although this is possibly a slight bit off because of the BNS forex issue). This way more than the grand total of $0 that I expected in yearly dividends at this same time last year. Earning dividends is truly earning money in pajamas. I do no more work after earning the capital. Then my capital goes to work for me.

If you want to keep up with my progress or learn about my other life hacking achievements and goals, be sure to sign up to follow the blog.

Disclaimer: I am not a licensed financial professional. Please use the information on this site for educational/entertainment purposes only. Be sure to check with a financial professional before purchasing equities.

Disclaimer 2: I may receive compensation if you decide to sign up for any of my affiliate links. This post mentions Swagbucks. I usually get $25 worth of PayPal cash each month from this site, and I use it to buy more stocks that then earn me more dividends that can then go and buy more stocks that then pay more dividends…and so forth. Should you choose to sign up, I thank you for your support.

A Trip to Europe on the Cheap

This is a blog about earning money without putting in time in an office, a fast food joint, or on a construction site. I aim to earn money from home so that I don’t have to spend more time away from the house. I definitely believe that there is more to life than money, but that more money can make life easier and open up options that are not available without it. I believe that a personal finance blog can be a great opportunity to show people hacks that can make their lives better. While earning money in pajamas can improve life, it’s also possible to get some great experiences without spending much. Last year, I wrote a post on how to save massive amounts of money on great trips with frequent flyer miles and hotel points.

Last month, I was able to cash in a load of these points and miles to get a deeply discounted trip to Europe. I cashed in 240,000 American Airlines Aadvantage miles to get six (count ’em, six) off-season tickets to Europe. These came from a couple of American Airlines sign-up bonuses and a couple of bonuses from the old US Airways card. I had long had Paris on my bucket list, and chose to visit the French capital on my vacation. One of the coolest things about the American Airlines award tickets is the ability to purchase one-way awards. Therefore, I decided that it would be a great opportunity to visit another European city in the process. I had to make sure that the tickets were on American Airlines flights (not with a partner like British Airways) because of fuel surcharges that are pretty massive on partner flights. I checked out tickets for my available dates to see if Rome, Barcelona, or Dublin would work. I struck out on each of these, but was able to land a flight to Madrid. Four of the tickets would leave from one city and two would leave from another airport substantially to the east of where I would be flying out of.  The total cost of each of these flights was less than $90–the cost of taxes that are required even with an award flight.

Eiffel TowerObligatory picture of the Eiffel Tour, or Le Tour Eiffel as the French call it, taken from my personal phone. 

Because my flights to and from Europe had what is called in the industry an open jaw, I had to get from Madrid to Paris. I did not have enough points to get the flight for taxes. Therefore, I checked on Expedia, and I was able to land flights for less than $70 each on Iberia Airlines. I could have gotten a slightly cheaper flight on a budget carrier, but these flights nickel and dime passengers with fees for just about anything, including carry-on bags. The total cost of six tickets from the US to Madrid, Madrid to Paris, and Paris to the US was right around $1,000 total. That’s the power of points and miles.

The Royal Palace in MadridThe Royal Palace in Madrid, again, taken by me

I then had to deal with getting lodging while in Europe. I only had a night to spend in Spain before a trip to Paris. I was able to get two rooms at a Holiday Inn Express in the Madrid area for free with IHG points. I then needed five nights in Paris. I was just short of the 280,000 points that I needed to get two rooms at the Marriott Charles de Gualle Airport hotel. I wound up spending $87.50 for the points I needed to put me over the top. Two rooms, one of which was upgraded to a family room upon arrival, for five nights cost a total of $87.50. Altogether, lodging and airfare for six people was slightly more than $1,000. That’s hard to beat. Of course, there were other expenses that added up over the trip, including food, tickets to Disneyland Paris, Versailles, the Louvre, ground transportation, and a day trip to Madrid and Toledo. Overall, it was a great trip, and it cost a fraction of what it might have had I attempted to pay the rack rate. While this was not a result of earning money in pajamas, it was an instance where taking advantage of opportunities that were available got me some great memories at a great discount.

A few credit card applications, meeting some spending bonuses buying stuff that I would be buying anyway, and cashing in the points I earned were all it took to take a dream vacation to Europe. Please note that I only recommend this for people who are able to pay off their cards on a monthly basis, as interest payments can quickly take away any benefit that the points provide and lead to massive amounts of debt. Proceed with caution if you have a spending problem. Also, remember that it’s important to actually have a good credit score to qualify for the bonuses.

If you’ve found this post useful, be sure to follow the blog to get the latest updates.

March 2016 Passive Dividend Income

The month of March has ended, and it’s one of my most favorite times of the month–time to update my monthly dividend income. My previous monthly record was just a whisker shy of reaching double figures (a Hamilton in US currency terms), and as the third month of the quarter seems to be the most popular for companies that pay out dividends, I was expecting to finally hit this level for the first time, about eight months after receiving my first dividend payment of a whopping $0.64 from Apple back in August. The month’s payments did not disappoint. Here they are:

Kellogg’s (K)                               $0.57

McDonald’s (MCD)                   $2.71

Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.B)      $10.34

TOTAL dividend income for March 2016:     $13.62 

Dividend income for 2016:                               $24.38

This total might not seem like much, but it’s money that I didn’t have to work for. It’s also $13.62 more than I was making in passive income just 8 months ago. Over time, this money should start to add up. My payment from Shell went toward DRIPping 0.23 shares in RDS.A. I’m not sure why it went toward the A shares as opposed to the B shares, but this additional purchase should add $0.86 toward my annualized dividend income, which is now estimated at $124.18. Dividend income is passive income, which is the best type of income. My other dividends are sitting in my Loyal3 account waiting to be deployed when I reach $10 or more so that I can diversify into another great company. This should happen next week after April payments from Coca-Cola and Wal-Mart.

During the month of March, I also added $25 purchases toward Apple and Wal-Mart stock in my Loyal3 account and 4 additional whole shares of AT & T in my TradeKing account. These purchases are additional building blocks toward financial freedom. You can open a TradeKing account here and receive a $50 bonus for signing up, funding an account, and making a minimum number of trades.  Some of my capital for stock purchases comes from my use of SwagBucks. Every time I get $25 in PayPal cash from SwagBucks, I transfer it to my bank and then one of my brokerage accounts. You can sign up for SwagBucks here. I earn money just for searching and watching videos, and it’s money I earn while simultaneously watching TV–definitely an example of maximizing time to earn money in pajamas.

Disclaimer: I am not a licensed financial professional. Please use the information on this site for educational/entertainment purposes only. Be sure to check with a financial professional before purchasing equities.

Disclaimer 2: I may receive compensation if you decide to sign up for any of my affiliate links. Should you choose to do so, I thank you for your support.

February 2016 Passive Dividend Income

Well, it’s my favorite time of the month. It’s time to look back and see how much passive income I was able to get from owning high-quality companies during the month of February. I owned no individual dividend stocks at this time last year, so anything is infinitely better than what I got from dividends in February 2015. I was able to deploy a little bit of capital over the month, so my income will hopefully grow even more in future months. I earned two dividends in February, and here they are, without further ado:

Apple (AAPL)                    $1.40

AT & T (T)                          $4.87

TOTAL for February:    $6.27

This was up from $5.41 in the second month of the last quarter, which was an increase of nearly 16 percent over the past three months. My AT & T dividend purchased 0.135 additional shares, which will add about $0.26 to my dividend payout when T forwards money to my DRIP in May. My total dividend income thus far in 2016 is up to $10.75, which is $10.75 ahead of this time last year. I also added some capital to Apple since the last payout, and it should grow. March should be a good month, as I will get paid by three different companies, including my largest holding. I should cross over the $10 mark for a single month for the first time. Hopefully, I can add a couple of zeros to this in the not-too-distant future.

I’m hoping to cross $10 of dividend income in my Loyal3 account that I can then use to open up another position. Starbucks (SBUX), Disney (DIS), or Unilever (UL) are the most likely subjects for this new position, but I’m waiting until I can make the purchase to decide for sure. Unilever has a higher dividend yield at the moment, and they sell stuff that people buy every day. However, the other two are likely to be able to grow their dividends more rapidly in the future because of low payouts. What would be the best buy in this circumstance? Let me know your thoughts?

I’m Making More Money with No Effort!

Last week was a great week on the earning money in pajamas front. As I preach over and over again, the best income is passive income, because it’s the me of today benefiting from the decisions that the me of ten years ago or a few weeks ago made. Not one, but two, companies in which I hold a small stake decided to increase their dividend payouts–on the same day, no less. This was a doubly great day. Now, I don’t profess to have a massive stash of income-producing stocks, as I’m just getting started on this dividend income journey, but regardless, any time that I get a raise for any reason whatsoever, I’m pretty happy.

Most of my raises have come from doing a good job as an employee or because I’ve changed jobs. This raise came from doing basically nothing other than investing in companies that have done a good job of building up massive cash flows that are enough to pay off a portion of the cash flow to their investors on a regular basis. My hope is that over time, I can build a growing stream of dividend income that allows me to work less as I get older.

Here are the dividend increases that I got last week:

Coca-Cola increased its quarterly dividend from $0.33 per share to $0.35 per share. This will add $0.58 to my annual forward dividend income based upon the slightly more than 7 shares that I currently hold. This is not a massive increase, but should I be able to add capital on a regular basis to where I have say 100 shares, this would be compounded to a much bigger benefit. The goal is small additions to my passive income stream compounding into a much larger income stream in the future.

Wal-Mart also announced a dividend increase. This one was only about 2 percent, as it was $0.01 per quarter. This added $0.18 to my annual dividend income based upon the ~4.5 shares that I currently hold. Many people would look at 18 cents and think whoop-de-doo. That’s nothing. They would be right, but 18 cents this year added to more capital, buying even more stock, and paying more dividends that increase by another penny or two on a quarterly basis can really add up over time. Warren Buffet did not start out a billionaire. I just read last week that he’s amassed 99 percent of his net worth after the age of 50. That’s pretty amazing to say the least. I’m hoping to amass quite a bit more than 99 percent of my net worth after age 40.

I have some money in the hopper that’s ready to buy some more stock through Loyal3, and I’m about to reach enough Swagbucks to get $25 more through PayPal that I can then use toward another stock purchase. I usually make my money with Swagbucks by letting videos play while I’m vegging out. It’s not a massive pile of cash, but it’s added up to nearly $1,000 over the past 3 years at a rate of about one $25 PayPal increment each month. You, too, can sign up for Swagbucks with my referral link and start earning toward cash through PayPal.

I’m letting my dividends grow in my Loyal3 account until they reach $10, and then I’m going to open another position with only my dividends. I’m also planning to add capital on a regular basis to increase my dividend payouts. It’s pretty exciting stuff to say the least. The only question is what new company to start investing in. Onward and upward as I attempt to make more passive income.

Disclaimer: I am not a licensed financial professional. This post is intended only for entertainment/educational purposes. Please consult with your financial advisor before purchasing securities.

January 2016 Passive Dividend Income

The first month of the year ended yesterday. I’m working on building up a passive income stream that can provide additional funding when it comes time to retire in addition to Social Security and any pension funds that I’m able to get. Dividends that consistently grow are a good sign that a company has adequate income to build their business and provide monetary benefits to its shareholders.

In the past six months, I’ve been able to build small positions in eight different companies that pay dividends each quarter. In January, two of my companies paid out dividends to me. I own a few shares of Wal-Mart (WMT) stock in an account with Loyal3. I also own a few shares of stock in the Bank of Nova Scotia (BNS) in a TradeKing account. The former pays cash into my account, while the latter allows me to automatically reinvest my dividends. This means that my BNS dividends should grow each quarter (at least in Canadian funds) without my doing anything else. I earned infinitely more in dividend income this month than I did at this time last year, as I was not investing in dividend-paying stocks. Any income whatsoever is an improvement over last January’s total of a big, fat goose egg. Without further ado, here is my dividend income for January 2016:

Wal-Mart (WMT)                            $1.48

Bank of Nova Scotia (BNS)          $3.00

TOTAL for January:                    $4.48

My BNS dividend purchased an additional 0.065 shares of stock in the company, which should add approximately $0.14 to my dividend next quarter given a similar exchange rate. I’ll be looking to add additional shares as funding comes available.

My $4.48 is not a massive amount of money, and it would allow me to take about 15 minutes off if I were to try and use my passive income to replace active income at this point. However, it’s a start, and as it’s been said many times before, the journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step. I’ve taken more than the first step, but I’m early in the journey and hope to add shares and passive income going forward. At this point, my forward dividend income is nearly $109. Hopefully, this will grow to $250 or more by the end of the year.  I’ve added this income summary to my monthly dividend income page.

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