Using Dividends to Buy More Dividends

One of my long-term goals is to build up a decent amount of wealth that can produce a nice level of passive income over the long haul. While I’m not likely to get to the $1 million per year in passive income, I believe that several thousand, if not tens of thousands in annual income, is definitely doable over the next couple of decades. When trying to earn money in pajamas, one of the best ways to make this happen is through dividend income. This is passive income that accumulates as a return on capital from allowing great companies to use said capital to operate and grow their businesses.  As I’ve said before, passive income is the best income.

Earning more money is always a good thing. The bad thing about earning more money is the time that it usually takes to do so. There are, however, some strategies that can be used to make more money without putting in any additional effort. Investing for dividends is one such strategy. Here is an article that lists three great reasons for investing in dividend paying stocks. The final reason is key. Even stable dividends pay out more over time. “How can this be?” you might be wondering. The answer is simple–COMPOUNDING.

There is one step and one step alone that is required to compound the your gains, provided that the dividend is left stable by the company paying it out. This one step is reinvesting. There are a couple of different avenues that can accomplish the reinvestment of dividends. The first is through a DRIP program. The DRIP stands for Dividend ReInvestment Program, and in this situation, an investor automatically reinvests the dividend into additional shares of the company that originally paid out the dividend. This will basically increase the dividend payout by the annual yield. A dividend yield of 3 percent that gets reinvested will see the annual dividend payment raise by about 3 percent over the course of a year because the number of shares that our hypothetical investor has should increase by about 3 percent. This is an increase in income that’s more than inflation has been over the past few years–all without lifting a finger.

Several brokerages, such as TradeKing, allow you to automatically DRIP your dividends into companies that permit dividend reinvestment. TradeKing is currently offering a $50 bonus for new signups under my referral link listed above.  You would get $50 for meeting the requirements, and I would also get $50. You don’t have to sign up with my link to invest through TradeKing, but I greatly appreciate any support you might feel like giving. This bonus could be used to buy a share or two of many great dividend-paying stocks.

Automatic reinvestment is one strategy, but there is another. I use the DRIP in my Tradeking account, but I have to use the other strategy in my Loyal3 account because DRIPing is not an option. This involves stocking up on dividend payments until a certain minimum amount of cash is reached. The minimum investment through Loyal3 is $10, and I pay no fees for my investments on this site. You can check out my review of Loyal3 here.  Those who invest through a TradeKing, Scwhab, or any other investment account can also pool dividends to diversify. It’s probably best to pool until a decent amount of money is available so that you can keep the transaction cost to a minimum. For example, a share of AT & T costs around $40 a share right now. Through TradeKing, if you were to purchase only one share, you’d pay $4.95 in transaction fees, which effectively adds about 12 percent to your purchase price.  It would also eat up more than the $1.92 in dividend income you’d get in the first year. It would be year three before dividend income would exceed your transaction cost. If you were to hold off until you could buy 10 shares, the transaction fee would drop to slightly more than 1 percent of the purchase price, which will definitely help long-term returns.

loyal3-logo

I decided in January to use my dividends from my Loyal3 account to diversify. Any additional purchases would come from new funds, while dividend income would just sit until I reached $10 in the account. During the first week of April, I reached the requisite level to make my first purchase from my dividend income stash. I decided that I would buy shares of Unilever (UL), which is a massive international consumer goods company that produces everything from butter to deodorant. I again started to pool the dividends after making this small $10 purchase, except now, I would be adding the small dividend from Unilever into the equation. My first payment came in June, and added $0.08 to my account.  Admittedly, this was a very small amount of money, but it allowed me to inch toward another purchase a little bit more quickly.

I hit $13 worth of dividends in my account by the first week of July, as my payment from Coca-Cola pushed me across the necessary $10 threshold. Again, I put the accumulated dividends toward more UL. Last week, I got my second payment from Unilever, and it was up to $0.17 over the course of a quarter, still not a huge amount, but an increase over the course of three months that allows me to edge ever closer to another purchase. This morning, I awoke to find that a dividend payment of nearly $4 from McDonald’s had posted into my account. This brought my account total $11.49, and I made my third purchase of Unilever stock for $11. If all goes according to plan, I will see a payment of around $0.25 for the fourth quarter in December.

I admit that I’ve put more capital toward my account with Loyal3 over the past nine months, but it’s been great to see that my dividends are growing and allowing me to purchase additional dividends. Even if I never added any additional capital to my account, I should be able to grow my dividends as companies decide to give dividend increases and I reinvest my dividends. This is the power of compounding. Of course, I’m hoping to have enough capital available to pay my bills and to invest each and every month going into the future, but seeing additional dividend income come in without doing more than making a few clicks and keystrokes is positive reinforcement. It’s exciting to see my dividend payments going higher and higher over time.

Disclaimer: I am not a financial advisor. This article is not a recommendation to buy any security. It is intended only for educational/entertainment purposes.

I am long all stock listed in this article.

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August 2016 Passive Dividend Income

Another month has come and gone, and again, it’s time to look over the past month and figure up the passive income that I’ve earned from owning great companies that are willing to return some of the capital that I’ve invested into their success.

I’ve decided to invest in companies that pay dividends, as those companies that are able to increase revenues and earnings over time are also able to increase the amount of their dividends. This is an example of my having my money working for me. This was the first month that I’ve been able to compare my dividend income on a year-over-year basis, as I “earned” my first dividend payment in August 2015. I have earned in quotes because I earned the money that initially went toward the  investment, but I did not have to put in any additional effort to get this passive income. My dollars are working for me, and over time, they should be able to earn even more, hopefully to the point that my money makes more than I can.

I received dividend payments from four companies in August. I received a payment from one new company, as well. Without further ado, here is my dividend income from the month of August 2016:

Starbucks (SBUX):                           $0.18

Apple (AAPL):                                    $2.57

AT & T (T):                                             $6.94

Omega Healthcare Inv. (OHI): $3.60

TOTAL for August 2016:           $13.29

This dividend income brings my total for the year up to $83.40 for the year, which is more than $10 a month. Furthermore, this dividend income for the month was $4.11 more than the dividend income I received in May. This equaled out to nearly a 45 percent increase in just one quarter.  When looking at my dividend income on a year-over-year basis, I went from $0.64 in August 2015 to $13.29 in August 2016. This equals out to a 1976 percent increase in just one year. Obviously, this will not be likely for every year in the future, but it is a nice increase to say the least.

Another point that I’d like to make regarding the dividend income I received in August. I am able to DRIP my dividends in my TradeKing account. This allowed me to purchase 0.097 additional shares of OHI and 0.160 shares of T. My additional fractional share of OHI will add $0.23 to my annual dividend income, and my additional fractional share of T will add $0.31 additional dividend income. These are not huge increases, but over time as they add up, they will make a difference in my dividend income.

My current anticipated annualized dividend income $204.64 after having purchased some additional OHI in an IRA that I rolled a former employer-sponsored retirement plan into. That’s about $17.05 a month on average. I’m getting closer to being able to take an hour off each month (figuring that I need $20 per hour to replace working income after noting that I won’t be paying out nearly so much in taxes at that point).

My dividend income is definitely an example of earning money in my pajamas. The companies that I invest in are making money around the world at any given time of the day. How was your dividend income in August?

Disclaimer: I am not a financial advisor. This article is not a recommendation to buy any security. It is intended only for educational/entertainment purposes.

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Join the Latest SWAGO for Bonus Swagbucks

http://www.swagbucks.com/?cmd=sb-trk&t0=blgTrk&t1=6187608&t2=501

It’s time for another round of SWAGO! What is SWAGO you ask? It’s a bingo-inspired promotion run by Swagbucks, a website that rewards you with points (called SB) for completing everyday online activities. You can redeem those SB for free gift cards. If you’ve never used Swagbucks, participating in SWAGO is a great introduction to the site. This particular round of SWAGO is all about online shopping.

Here’s what you need to know to get your 200 SB Bonus (and don’t worry, you don’t have to make a purchase to complete a pattern):

  • Shop Swago will begin on Monday, August 29th at 1pm PDT/3pm EDT, make sure you hit “Join” otherwise you won’t get credit for completing the action items. Each square on your Swago Board will contain an action item to complete.
  • Once you complete the action item in a particular square the square will change color signifying the action item is complete.
  • You have a limited amount of time to mark off as many squares as possible so use your time wisely.
  • Be mindful of the patterns and their corresponding bonuses located on the right of your Swago Board. The patterns will vary in difficulty and bonus value.
  • Once you’ve achieved a pattern the corresponding “Submit” button will light up. You can have multiple patterns available for submission, however, you can only submit ONE pattern so choose wisely.
  • The game ends Monday, September 5th at 12pm PDT/3pm EDT. So make sure to hit “Submit” on the pattern you wish to submit. If you don’t hit “Submit” before the game ends you won’t receive your SB bonus.

The Chase Sapphire Reserve Card Verdict–Rejected

Last year, I wrote an article about saving money with credit cards.  I know that some of the leading financial gurus in the US, most notably Dave Ramsey, want every credit card that has ever been created to be cut up into very tiny little pieces. They then want the very tiny little pieces of what used to be credit cards burned in a giant bonfire so that no one can ever use one again for any purpose at any time. I tend to disagree, because I can get some pretty cool benefits if I score some big signup bonuses and pay of my cards on a monthly basis so that I’m paying nothing in interest payments.

Already this year, I’ve been on a couple of pretty cool international trips. I had a week-long jaunt across the pond for Spring Break, visiting Madrid and Paris along the way.  While I spent some money on this trip, I literally saved thousands on what the retail cost would have been because points and miles paid for my flights and hotels.  Just a couple of months later, I found a killer sale on Southwest flights to Puerto Vallarta from the major airport that’s nearest my home.  A round-trip ticket was slightly more than 5,600 Rapid Rewards miles apiece. I found a really, really nice Marriott resort for $97/night and pulled the trigger.  I would not have been able to take these trips without the frequent flyer miles and hotel points that I’d accrued over the past couple of years.

When I started reading about the rumors over the past month or so that Chase Bank was going to have a super-duper premium credit card that earned Ultimate Rewards points, my interest was definitely piqued. The rumor was that for a $450 annual fee, cardholders could earn 100,000 Ultimate Rewards points after spending $4,000 (above the annual fee) within three months. Additionally, users would get a $300 credit on travel expenses each calendar year. The card was supposed to come out in August, so my thought was that I could get two $300 credits for one $450 annual fee. This would, in effect, mean that I could actually GET PAID $150 to get the card, in addition to the massive sign-up bonus that could come very close to getting my family a one-way saver trip to Europe or Asia all by itself.

Were the rumors too good to be true? It turns out that they were not. The benefits of the card were just as impressive as advertised. However, there was concern that the infamous 5/24 rule would be in effect for the card. This unwritten and unofficial secret squirrel rule means that if you’ve opened 5 cards from any bank over the past 24 months, Chase will most likely deny your application for many of their best travel cards, although, as with most rules, there appear to be some exceptions. I read several of my favorite travel blogs to get an idea of whether to expect this possibility. I thought that I had only opened four in the past 24 months regardless. However, I forgot that I’d held a card as an authorized user. Unfortunately, these count against the 5/24 rule that Chase won’t even confirm exists.  Another problem was that the blogs indicated that many people who had opened more than 5 cards were getting denied, although there were some spotty approvals for people who had opened more cards, sometimes many more cards.

Regardless of my fears, I decided to pull the trigger when the application link became available this week. I applied on the first day that I could have gotten a Sapphire Reserve, hoping to score the massive 100,000 point bonus with lots of Ultimate Rewards points added to my account. I love these points, because I can transfer them to airlines like United and Southwest (I’ve used them both for reward trips over the past couple of years). I can also transfer them to hotel loyalty programs like IHG (best known for the Holiday Inn chain), Marriott, and Hyatt. I once scored three nights at a Hyatt House about 10 minutes from Disneyland for only 8,000 points a night after using another Southwest sale to fly to LAX.

Anyhoo, to make a long story short, after I hit the submit button, I got the dreaded “We have to review your application and we’ll get back to you in 7-10 days” message that usually indicates that an applicant is going to get a big thumbs down on his or her attempt to score a card. I decided to call the reconsideration line, and my concerns were well-founded. Too many cards opened in the last 24 months was the verdict. One of my cards should fall of the list in October. At that point, if the bonus stays high enough, I might just attempt it again.

Did you attempt to get the Chase Sapphire Preferred card? How did it work out?

Don’t Be A Nattering Nabob of Negativism

Do you see the glass as half full, or do you see it as half empty? It’s usually understood that the former are optimists, while the latter are pessimists. When it comes to earning money online or through financial markets, there are many negative people who think that it can’t be done. I’ll just be able to make pennies, they argue. These people are probably *nattering nabobs of negativism who don’t really accomplish much in life.

Pessimism can bring you down. Optimism, unlike the arguments made by people like Norman Vincent Peale and Joel Osteen, is not a near guarantee of success.  However, it’s important to remember that those who feel that they cannot accomplish a task successfully are very likely to experience what would be considered a self-fulfilling prophecy. Most of the time, they don’t even get started because they figure it’s no use. Those who are optimists will at least try.

These nattering nabobs of negativism are like Eeyore, expecting rain on every sunny day. They are like Rocky the Flying Squirrel who gives Bullwinkle a hard time with every attempt to pull a rabbit out of his hat. Rocky doesn’t encourage the Moose, he just argues that it’ll never work. Perhaps it won’t but Bullwinkle keeps trying. Those who fail to try never accomplish much of anything.

Those who fear the stock market look back to the Great Recession. They might have lost more than one-half of their entire nest egg. There are those who sold out at the bottom because of a lost job. This is understandable, as money is necessary to eat if you don’t have several months of expenses saved up.  Then there are those who sold out at the bottom because of negativism. They lost a bunch of money when others who stayed in the market because of the optimism that the market generally recovers were able to see their accounts reach previous highs and then move on to even greater highs. We’re now near all-time highs.

Warren Buffett Is NOT A Pessimist

Pessimists are always down on the future of the United States.  “It’s never been this bad before.” I don’t know how many times I’ve heard this argument over the past few years. One of the most successful investors in history, however, is really, really optimistic about the future of the United States. Warren Buffett has done pretty well for himself over the course of his life. He’s seen opportunities that others have missed. His investing strategy has earned him average gains of about 19 percent a year. This means he doubles his money in about 3.5 years on average. Now, as some politicians are arguing that the US is in a horrific economic condition, Buffett would argue otherwise.

Those who are Eeyores in life are probably not nearly as successful as Warren Buffett. This is not to say that there should never be cause for concern about the economy or that people should just throw money at the market at any price. Buffett buys solid companies at good prices. There are some great companies out there that are pretty expensive and should be avoided until there are better prices. There could be a recession in the near future, but this could actually provide  a buying opportunity for those who are willing to take a bit of a risk. The recommendation is always to buy low and sell high. Because of pessimism, however, people generally follow the herd and buy high and sell low. When thinking of avoiding an overly pessimistic outlook, here are three big reasons why optimism can help you achieve your goals.

You’ll See Opportunities Others Easily Miss

Where others see only a snowstorm dumping two feet of snow and ruining their days, the optimist sees an opportunity to make some money shoveling the snow. When it seems that the paycheck barely pays the bills each month, the optimist will start to look for options to make more money. Here are 10 easy ways to make money that people can use without spending any money outside of Internet access. I’ve personally used Swagbucks and  Cashcrate to make more than $1,000 each while sitting in my recliner.

Where the nattering nabob of negativism sees no need to save for the future, because it’s going to be worse than it is today, the optimist sees the opportunity that some extra money saved up over time can provide. After all, a dollar a day can really add up over time when capital gains and dividends are added to the mix.

You’ll Try Again If Things Don’t Immediately Work Out

Things will not always work out. Pessimists will tend to think that they never will work out when they don’t work out the first time.  This outcome is not always a given. Optimists will try to learn from the experience. There is a reason why people fail. Those who pick themselves back up are more likely to achieve their goals over the long term. A quote attributed to Thomas Edison regarding the invention of the light bulb shows this ability to learn from mistakes and try again. It was argued that he’d failed to invent the incandescent light bulb. He retorted that he’d not failed. He’d successfully found 10,000 ways that did not work.  He eventually succeeded. Had he been a pessimist, Edison probably would have quit well before his 9,999th “failure.”

Other People Will Notice

Recessions happen. Downsizing and offshoring are common phenomena. People lose jobs. These situations can lead to quite the competition for the jobs that are left. Who will get the job? A person with a reputation for negativism who comes across with a “woe is me” attitude? NO! Those who have a positive attitude and a reputation for hard work in spite of setbacks are much more likely to get the nod. I’m not likely to hire a plumber or a carpenter who acts like a job is impossible. If I owned a car dealership, I’d want salesmen who actually believed that they could sell cars. Those who are optimists are likely to look for great solutions even if things don’t go quite as well as they might in the short run, and other people will notice this ability in them.

Getting ahead with a positive attitude is pretty difficult. After all, there are only a handful of Warren Buffetts, Sam Waltons, and Steve Jobses.  However, its pretty near impossible to get ahead with a perpetually negative attitude. That’s why it’s important to avoid being an Eeyore who others view as a nattering nabob of negativism.

*The term nattering nabobs of negativism originated in a speech by Vice President Spiro Agnew as he described members of the media.

Disclaimer: I may earn bonuses should you choose to sign up for programs with my referral links. You’ll still get the great benefits by going directly to the site without clicking my link, but I appreciate any support that you might give. 

July 2016 Passive Dividend Income

It’s now come to that time of the month to review my passive dividend income of the past month. I like to look at the income that I get from doing nothing outside of investing in high-quality companies that do business with people around the world. Every dividend payment is a positive reinforcement that increases my nest egg.

I received only two dividend payments for July, as there are fewer companies who pay in the first month of the quarter. Regardless, my payments from these two companies was higher than it was in April. My dividend earnings for July were as follows:

Bank of Nova Scotia (BNS):                     $4.98

Coca-Cola (KO):                                             $3.52

TOTAL for July:                                             $8.50

My dividend from BNS was reinvested to purchase 0.084 additional shares of this company. This will add a few cents to my dividend income each quarter. How much is a bit debatable because of foreign exchange rates.

The total amount of the dividends that I earned in July came to $8.50. This is $0.40 less than my amount from the same month in the last quarter. The reason for the decline is related to the unusual payout schedule that Wal-Mart adheres to. They pay out in April and again in June, so I’ve already received my payment from Wally World.

My annual dividend income now stands at $70.11. This is just a bit more than $10 a month. August should be a better month for passive income, as should September.  My hope is that this is the final month that I have an income in the single digits. Another hope that I have is that three figures for a month will come in due time. I will add this to my dividend income page. How was your month of dividend income?

Disclaimer: I am not a financial advisor. This article is not a recommendation to buy any security. It is intended only for educational/entertainment purposes.

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How to Save Money on Amusement Parks

Summer is the time of year when most kids are out of school and the weather is pretty warm throughout the country. Many families take vacations during the summer so as to avoid conflicts with school, and one of the more common stops on family vacations is the amusement park.

Growing up, I went to King’s Island near Cincinnati, Ohio, nearly on an annual basis. I first visited the park probably around 1978. I lived only about four hours away, so it was a visit that I could turn into a day trip as I got old enough to drive. I bet I’ve been to the park about 20 times in my life. I’ve been to other parks, but this is the park I’ve visited the most.

Replica of the Eiffel Tower at King's Island in Mason, OH
Replica of the Eiffel Tower and fireworks at King’s Island in Mason, OH–Photo by Author

While visiting with some friends in the area, I decided to take my family of four to King’s Island. I looked up the ticket prices. Buying a ticket at the gate was a whopping $64. I think I paid around $40 on my last trip about 12 years ago. This seemed pretty high for a non-Disney visit.

Buy Online

One of the easiest ways to save money on many park tickets is to buy this ticket online. Purchasing the tickets before your visit costs anywhere between $42.99 and $46.99 for an all-day ticket. That’s a pretty big discount over the $64 that you’d pay by driving up and buying admission at one of the park’s ticket booths. Multiply it by four (or whatever the number of people in your family is), and suddenly, we’re talking real money.  I was also able to purchase online tickets for Disneyland Paris at a discount earlier this year. These tickets today are starting at $53 for specific days.

Go On Off-peak Dates

I noted the $53 Disneyland Paris tickets in the paragraph above. These only work on specific days. Disney parks in the USA are also charging different prices based upon when a person wants to visit. Those going at peak times are going to have to pay for the privilege. Going back to King’s Island, I was able to get in at a big discount back in the early 2000s (if memory serves correct, the admission cost was $19.99). The catch was the fact that the visit came in late October, which was right around the time that the park was closing for the season.

Buy a Late Admission Ticket

I noted earlier that I found online tickets as low as $42.99 for my recent visit to King’s Island. This was not the lowest price available however. Those who are willing to wait until 4pm to visit and purchase their tickets online can get in for as little as $30.99. This is a cost savings of more than half. I remember that most of my trips to King’s Island saw me getting to the park around opening at 10am, and with the exception of exactly one trip with a couple of friends, I never closed the park down. Most of the time, I left around 5pm so that I could get a quick meal and drive home at a decent hour. That meant about 7, maybe 8 hours in the park. I decided it would be a good idea to wait until right at 4 to get to the park. Sure enough, I saw more people leaving than going in at this time. They got 6 hours of fun for anywhere between $43 and $64, while I got 6 hours of fun in a less-crowded park for $31. Who got the better deal?

Another example I have is from a visit to the Nickelodeon Universe at the Mall of America. We visited this park three years ago, as the Twin Cities was the closest major city for us at the time. We had visited and let the kids ride a couple of the rides by buying tickets. We’d spend quite a bit for just a handful of rides, as we were more interested in shopping on previous visits. We then found that you could buy a ticket to ride all day for about $35. Wait until 5pm, and we found that you could ride as much as you can ride  until closing for only $19.99. While Nickelodeon Universe is far from the most impressive amusement park in the world, $19.99 is not a bad price for a few hours of fun.

SpongeBob SquarePants Rock Bottom Plunge at the Mall of America, via Gerstlauer Amusement Rides GmbH at Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 3.0de

Looking into these three tips can help you maximize your money when going to an amusement park. While this is not earning money in pajamas, it is a step that can help you make the dollars you make go a bit further, and who can be against that?

Earning Money in Pajamas with GiftHulk

There are many sites on the Internet that allow people to earn money from the comfort of their living rooms and dens. This site has covered several of these. I recently verified another site that allows users to earn money in Pajamas. This site is called GiftHulk, and many of the mechanisms for making money are similar to those available on sites like SwagBucks and CashCrate.

One of the easiest ways to earn the digital currency on GiftHulk, called Hulk Coins, is through search. Users can make unlimited searches, but only one per hour, the first of each new hour, will actually pay out. The searches that pay earn 4 hulk coins, which amounts to about 0.4 cents, depending upon the reward or gift card that the user decides to purchase with the Hulk Coins.

GiftHulk also has a number of surveys that its users can complete. The rewards for completing these surveys can vary quite extensively, from less than 100 HulkCoins to several hundred.  One of the more interesting ways to earn points is through the win link:

Guess the Card
Guess the Card

Users can click on the drop down link for “Guess the Card” and win Hulk Coins. There are three options: the exact card, the number, or the suit, and the number of Hulk Coins that you could win is related to how difficult the guess is.  Additionally, a win will sometimes come with an earnings boost. I’ve been able to get anywhere between 8 and 14 percent in addition to the base earnings. This boost will last for several hours.

Like SwagBucks and CashCrate, there are also options to watch a number of different videos. You will not likely win Hulk Coins for each individual video, but will rather have to watch through a number of videos to earn a varying number of Hulk Coins. These can be watched while sitting around in pajamas. Usually, the number of Hulk Coins that you can expect to win will be 15 or less.

GiftHulk also has a shopping portal that users can click through to major retailers to earn Hulk Coins on their purchases. The retailers include options like Wal-Mart, Target, Macy’s, and Expedia. The number of Hulk Coins that a purchase earns varies based upon the specific retailer utilized. For example, BJ’s Wholesale is currently offering 8 Hulk Coins per dollar (about 0.8 cents), while Verizon is offering 100 Hulk Coins for each dollar spent. This amounts to a 10 percent discount.

When it comes to cashing out, GiftHulk has a very low redemption level for what I would consider “good” awards. Like SwagBucks, users can cash out for PayPal cash, which is my favorite award, as I can use it to purchase stocks that will pay me additional passive income, which is the best form of income.  Some users might opt for an Amazon gift card, or, with the popularity of Pokemon Go, there’s the option of getting gift cards toward this current phenomenon.

Rewards available on GiftHulk
Rewards available on GiftHulk

One award that people might be interested in purchasing that most other sites do not have available is BitCoin. This cryptocurrency is available from GiftHulk. It varies in relation to actual dollars, and it’s more expensive than $5 from PayPal. 5 mBTC costs 6,000 Hulk Coins, which is about $6 when related to the cash from PayPal.

You can buy BitCoin through GiftHulk
You can buy BitCoin through GiftHulk

From what I’ve been able to tell, it seems easier to earn with SwagBucks than it is with GiftHulk. This does not mean that the site is without value. It does pay out, and sometimes, there are videos available when they are not available on SwagBucks. Therefore, it can be an alternative method for earning a bit of money from home. You can sign up for GiftHulk here if you want to give it a try.

Disclaimer: This site publishes referral links from time to time. These will generally provide a small payout for me. You can sign up for the same sites without the referral link and get the same benefits (i.e. payout) that you get from using the link. However, should you decide to sign up with my links, I definitely appreciate the support. 

If this post helped you, be sure to follow the site to get updates. I’m also on Twitter at @moneyinpajamas.

June 2016 Passive Dividend Earnings

Another month has come and gone, and I made some money in pajamas during June 2016. While I do quite a bit of work from home (or on the road) most months, my goal is to get a higher percentage of that income to come from passive sources. The biggest source of passive income that I’ve decided to work on is income via dividends. These payments from quality companies generally come in on a quarterly basis, and they provide me with additional capital to put toward additional stock in high-quality companies that I already own or that I have on my wants list.

My money can work harder than I can over time. I have to put in effort to earn money, but I have a limited number of hours in the day that I can actually work. My money can work day after day after day, 24 hours a day, 265 days a year. While I have a relatively small trickle coming in these days, I am planning to see this tiny stream grow into a rushing river of dollars in the future. It might take several years to get there, but if I’m able to continue on this path that I’ve started, I fully anticipate that my goals can be reached. The companies that I own paid me on several occasions last month, and without further ado, here is the passive dividend income that I didn’t have to work to earn in the month of June:

Unilever PLC (UL)                                $0.08

Wal-Mart (WMT)                                 $3.02

Kellogg (K)                                                $0.72

McDonald’s (MCD)                            $3.40

Royal Dutch Shell PLC (RDS.B)    $11.63

TOTAL DIVIDEND INCOME FOR JUNE 2016     $18.82

This dividend income might not seem like a massive amount, but it is a record for me. My previous high for a month was back in March, when I received $13.62 from my dividend-paying stocks. This was a 38% increase over just the past three months. This income brings up my total annual dividend earnings up to $61.61. I am now up to averaging a cool $10 per month in dividend income, and I’ve almost passed the $20 mark for a single month. I measure my progress by the number of hours of work that I could theoretically take off were I to replace work with passive income. My estimated annual dividend income at this point is up to $147.57, which is right around 7.5 hours were I to figure that I need to replace $20 per hour (after taxes and retirement contributions that would no longer come out). In June, I could have almost taken off an hour of work at this rate. My hope is that this will only continue to grow over time.

Disclaimer: I am not a licensed financial professional. Be sure to do due diligence before investing in securities. This article is not a recommendation to buy a specific company. It is only for educational/entertainment purposes.

How Swagbucks Allows Me to Earn Passive Income from Dividends

My very first post on this site more than three years ago touched on the benefits that users could earn from the site SwagBucks (you can sign up here).  The site allows users to complete a number of different tasks that earn a virtual currency known as Swagbucks. This virtual currency is not like Bitcoin in that the value can vary greatly over time. The Swagbucks pretty much have a fixed redemption value of one cent per Swagbuck. This current post is going to show you how you can cash in and start to earn passive income that could literally last for the rest of your life.

Many people who use the site cash in for things like $5 e-gift cards from retailers like Amazon or Walmart. I do not choose to use this redemption option. The coolest of all redemptions, in my estimation, is $25 in PayPal cash. I use the site to earn money in pajamas, and have been putting my PayPal cash to work earning money on the money I earned in my pajamas.

I need to get 2,500 Swagbucks to cash in on PayPal. I can earn these 2,500 Swagbucks in a variety of ways. One of the most common options is by searching on the web. I use the search bar, and the site randomly provides a number of Swagbucks that generally ranges between 4 and 50. Here is a picture of what a “win” looks like:

I scored 11 Swagbucks with this search.
I scored 11 Swagbucks with this search.

One way that I can earn more Swagbucks is through online surveys. I tend to look at the surveys under “Gold Surveys” the most, as I seem to have more luck getting them to credit. The surveys that pay out 50 Swagbucks for 10 minutes are generally from a site called Opinion Central, and I have had pretty good success from these. They generally take less than the 10 minutes advertised, as well.

I opt for the New Gold Surveys
I usually opt for the New Gold Surveys

Another major way that you can earn Swagbucks in pajamas while watching the TV is by watching videos. There are a couple of options that I’ve found that I can earn quite a few Swagbucks pretty quickly.  I frequently will watch videos by clicking on this dude who’s sitting behind a laptop:

Click on this guy to watch videos that credit on Swagbucks.
Click on this guy to watch videos that credit on Swagbucks.

After clicking on laptop guy, you will then be taken to a screen that invites you to watch the videos. You have to scroll through a few (usually between 5 and 10, although sometimes there will be an ad campaign with just one video). This usually pays out 2 Swagbucks, which is admittedly not much, but I can easily scroll through them while watching TV (this is the maximizing spare time for income, folks). Sometimes around Christmas, the process will pay out 3 Swagbucks per task. You would click through all of the videos. I set up my screen to look like this so that I know when to click the green button:

Swagbucks Videos 2

Another easy way to earn a few Swagbucks while watching TV is through nCrave videos. I like the ones that are highlighted here. I use the ones with the swirling arrow icon that’s circled in red:

Encrave Videos can help you earn some Swagbucks with little effort.
nCrave Videos can help you earn some Swagbucks with little effort.

After clicking on the nCrave video, you need to make sure that the “Discovery Mode” is toggled to the green check mark. This will let the carousel of videos play automatically. Again, you won’t get rich overnight from this process, but it’s a few Swagbucks for very little effort. They do add up over time.

Make sure the Discovery Mode is toggled on to automatically cycle through the videos.

Make sure the Discovery Mode is toggled on to automatically cycle through the videos. 

I work on several of these tasks when watching TV on a daily basis. Most months, I am able to cash in at least $25 toward PayPal cash; some months, I cash out $50. When this cash hits my PayPal account, I can then transfer it to my linked back account and then transfer it to a brokerage account. I’ve been transferring it to Loyal3 each month. When it hits Loyal 3, I can then invest with no commission in one of the 60-some companies that this brokerage allows people to invest in. I reviewed how I use Loyal3 here.

Each PayPal cashout will allow me to get around $0.75 per year for life for each $25 I invest (when estimating a dividend yield of 3%). Over the course of the year, I will get around $10 in dividend income, give or take a few dollars, depending upon the companies invested in. This is where the concept gets pretty cool. That $10 in dividend income can then be put into additional stock, and the compounding process can begin.  The money that I earned in pajamas with Swagbucks can then go toward making its own money, which will then make more money. Over time, even if one or two companies go belly-up (I buy only companies that are paying dividends, and I invest in multiple companies to diversify my risk), I should have a pretty decent amount of income coming in on a quarterly basis. The major factor for success is persistence.  Check out this article on the power of getting just an extra dollar a day to invest.

What Are You Waiting For? 

To get the ball started, you can sign up for Swagbucks here. Please note that should you do so, I could get compensated for referring you. I only share method’s that I’ve used myself that work. I’ve earned more than $1,000 via Swagbucks since signing up, and the majority of this income has been earned by my activity, not referrals. Now the money I’m earning is earning its own passive income. Should you decide to sign up with my link, I appreciate your support. Good luck earning money in pajamas.

If you’ve learned something new from this post, be sure to sign up to follow the blog. I update it fairly frequently with the ways that I’m earning passive income.

Making Money without Leaving the House