Stock Purchase–AAPL

This week, I added another position toward my goal of earning money in pajamas with dividend stocks. My first purchase of $100 went toward WalMart Stock. My second purchase was a bit larger because I wanted to make sure that I was able to purchase a whole share of another company with my Loyal3 account. This stock is one of the biggest and most popular in all the world. I decided to buy some stock in Apple Computer. Of course, the best time to buy some Apple stock would have been around 1999, but I was not really into stocks at that point. However, with some money from previous birthdays still available to put to work, I decided to jump in now.

My goal is to earn additional money without actually putting in additional hours for it. Therefore, buying Apple would not have been on my radar had I started just a few years ago. In 2012, however, the company started paying dividends again after a long hiatus. The dividend has been steadily growing since its resumption. The current yield is not terribly high, as it is in the 1.7 percent range, but it has shown growth to the upside. The P/E ratio and the payout ratio for the dividend are both solid, and everyone knows that iPhones and iPads are all the rage with kids these days.

I put in a total of $150 into AAPL, and this bought me 1.2313 shares in the company. Currently, the dividend on this stock stands at $2.08 per share after a big 7-for-1 split last year. My current holdings should net me about $2.56 in dividends over the next year. When added to my anticipated dividends from my WalMart purchase, my current estimated dividend income for the next year should be right around $5.60. Both of these stocks could raise their dividends in the next year, so that increase would be added to my $5.60. I also plan to buy a few more positions in the near term, and I have some plans for utilizing some passive income to buy even more, which will give even more passive income. My hope is to increase my dividend income each year until I can replace a significant percentage of my expenses by retirement. They say that the journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step, and I look at these purchases as the first two steps in my journey.

I’ll plan to give updates on any future purchases, as well as any income as it starts to come in.

Disclaimer: I am not a financial professional. The information on this site is for educational/informational purposes only. Investors in the stock market can lose money, up to and including all of their investment. Please consult a financial professional before making any investments in the market.

Earning Money in Pajamas with Dividends on Loyal3

As I wrote in my last post, passive income is the best income. One of the best ways to get passive income that I noted in that article was through dividend stocks. These stocks are issued by companies who have created enough income and built up enough equity through their business operations to return some of the profits to those who invest in their endeavors. While reading up on dividend growth investing over the past few weeks, I stumbled upon recommendations for a website that allowed for fee-free investing. This site Loyal3.com allows investors to put in as little as $10 toward a number of quality stocks–without having to pay any commissions. I was intrigued to say the least.

I have some money that I’ve had laying that’s come from birthday and Christmas gifts over the last few years, so I decided to open an account and put it to work because it’s basically been earning nothing. I decided to buy $100 worth of WalMart stock last week to see how the site worked. The transaction went through today, and that $100 investment bought me 1.398 shares of ownership in Wally World. WalMart currently pays an annual dividend of $1.96 per share, which is split into four quarterly payments, so this will give me about $2.70 in dividend income over the next year. I chose WalMart because it’s the biggest retailer in the world, it makes lots of money, it pays a solid dividend that’s increased every year for around four decades, and it trades at a relatively low price-to-earnings ratio. As this went through pretty easily, I have decided to buy some more stocks on Loyal3 with the funds that I have available.

The Loyal3 site is pretty easy to navigate, and it only took a few minutes to go from creating an account to linking a bank account and telling the site what to purchase. The transfer of funds from my bank took from Saturday to Tuesday, and the purchase went through on Tuesday morning. The site only makes purchases in a couple of batches each day, so this is something to consider if you’re looking to purchase at a specific price as you can’t totally control the purchase price. I chose this “broker” because most other low-cost brokers are quite expensive if you don’t have a fairly large sum to invest. For example, I considered TradeKing with its $4.95 fee per trade, but for a $100 investment, I’d be starting about 5 percent in the hole before the stock moved up or down at all. It would take a purchase of $500 to make TradeKing or Scott Trade worth it, in my estimation. If I get a good nest egg going, I’ll probably open an account with one of these sites to further diversify without paying heavy fees. With Loyal3, I can buy fractional shares for as little as a $10 investment and it costs me nothing, as most well-established stocks are not going to shift in price by 5 percent on the vast majority of days.

There are some negatives that come with the Loyal3 platform. One is the afforementioned fact that the site utilizes batch trading, rather than up-to-the-minute trades. This can lead to some fluctuations in price, but as noted above, I don’t think that’s going to wipe out any advantage gained by avoiding paying a fee on a smallish trade, at least the vast majority of the time. Another negative is the fact that the site only has a relationship with slightly more than 60 companies, but some of these are among the biggest names around. Included are stocks like: WalMart, Apple Computer, Intel, Microsoft, Coca-Cola, Kellogg’s, PepsiCo, and others. Each of these pay a good dividend that’s grown in recent years (sometimes for decades straight). Energy and healthcare companies are not get included.

However, for my current level of investment ability, I think that the Loyal3 platform should work well for my purposes.  I plan to spend the rest of the money I have available, purchase additional shares with some other passive income, and then reinvest any dividends that I get. The goal is to increase dividend income year-over-year to where I have a nice cash flow supplement when it comes time to retire. Dividends are definitely passive income, and WalMart is active in many countries around the globe, so this company is literally providing income (albeit a very small amount at the moment) while I’m in bed, which is one of the best ways to earn money in pajamas.

Disclaimer: I am not an investment professional. Therefore, this article is intended only for entertainment/informational purposes and is not an actual recommendation to buy any specific security. Stocks go up and down, and investors can and do lose money.

Passive Income is the Best Income

This site is dedicated to getting people to think a bit outside the box and make some money whilst in their pajamas. Most people think that money only comes from going into an office (or a fast food joint or retail store) and putting in eight, ten, or sixteen hours sitting in a cubicle, or, if they’re lucky, a corner office with a view. This is definitely one of the ways that people make money. Some of them are quite successful in bringing in money this way. However, until the power of passive income is brought to bear, they will have to continue going into the office eight or more hours a day to continue to make more of the green stuff (or colorful stuff if you happen to live outside the US).

While teens might be thinking of ways to make money this summer, or a working-class parent might be looking for ways to make more money all of the time, saving up money over the long-term can be a great way to start toward passive income. The difference between active and passive income can be summarized in this statement:

You work for active income. Passive income works for you. 

In other words, you have to actually go to work and do some task or create some item that people are willing to pay for in order to make money the old-fashioned and more common way of making active income. Passive income is that money that is created from having capital or knowledge invested in a money-making tool. This capital is probably going to have some work associated with it initially. Few people are born with silver spoons in their mouths, so they will have to do some work to make some money to start with. This is where self-discipline comes in. I’ve already noted the power of a dollar on this site, but to summarize what I’ve pointed out before, saving a dollar a day from your teenage years to your normal retirement age of around 65 could net a nest egg of over $250,000. Saving four dollars a day over that time will net a cool million. Save even more, and we can really, really get into some pretty cool numbers or a retirement (or semi-retirement with only work you want to do) that could start decades before most people think you really should retire. 

How to Get Passive Income

Dads can make money in their spare time while watching television.

Dads can make money in their spare time while watching television.

Savings Accounts

There are several ways to get passive income. One of which is the old-school savings account or certificate of deposit. However, there is a problem with this. The income that you get will actually decrease over time unless you add more money to your stash of cash because the interest that you will get in these days of near-zero fed funds rates will get eroded by inflation. Nonetheless, for every $1,000 that you’ve got in one of these instruments, you could theoretically make a dollar or two a years. Have a cool million? We’re talking about $10,000 or $20,000 in passive income. Some families live quite comfortably on this income every year.

Dividend Stocks

Some people really like dividend stocks. These stocks will pay a dividend from their earnings on a regular basis (usually quarterly).  In fact, one blogger known as Dividend Mantra is trying to get enough passive income together to retire on his dividend payments alone. The lower your expenses are, the quicker this goal can be achieved. For example, you’ll need much less passive income if you’ve got $20,000 in annual expenses vs. if you’ve got $50,000 in annual expenses. Mine are actually closer to the higher figure, but this can still be done if an income is higher and you can save quite a bit of money.

One of the cool things about this dividend stream is that it only went down a bit more than 20% in the last market crash in which the overall market went down more than 50%. This means that passive income from dividends can actually wind up being a better deal. Also, for those who are still building a nest egg, these dividends can go toward buying more shares that will increase the amount of dividends that a person can earn over time. Here’s a good post from Joshua Kennon on how reinvesting dividends on an initial $10,000 investment affected an investment in Coca-Cola stock over 50 years.

Appreciating Stocks

While dividends are technically regular stocks, not all stocks pay dividends, which are in effect cash payments to investors. Other stocks can still pay off because of price appreciation. When adding in dividends and price appreciation over time, the stock market has returned an average of 8 to 10% over the past century plus. That’s a pretty good track record. Until recent years, Apple (which happens to be one of the best-performing stocks on the market) did not even provide a dividend. However, in the late 1990s, the stock was in the $4 range. Those who invested money at this point were not hurt by the lack of a dividend, however. The stock’s price went up over $600 per share before splitting last year. A person who bought at the bottom, or even the middle, of this spike would have profited handsomely, even without a dividend. They would not have had to have worked an extra second to make that money, as Apple would have contributed to their income.

Bonds

Bonds are long-term debt instruments that have performed quite well over time. Governments like the national governments of the US, Canada, the UK, or even Paraguay frequently issue bonds to finance current spending levels. They promise to pay out a certain yield (basically a payment for allowing the government to borrow your money, much like a savings account for a bank). State and local governments, as well as corporations, will also frequently issue bonds. Some of these bonds are taxable, but municipal bonds are free from federal income taxes. When thinking of tax ramifications, be sure to check with an accountant or financial planner to see what will pay off best. The amount that a government or business has to pay in interest is related to their perceived stability. For example, the US currently has a very low interest on bonds payable, while Greece is in danger of defaulting on their debt and has to pay a high premium.

Getting Others to Make Money for You

There are marketing systems in which individuals can get referral income in various ways. For example, Amazon has an associate’s program in which web content providers can get a certain cut of any sales that their page or site generates. This starts out at a 4% payment, but goes up from there. Of course, like the other options, there is some work required at first, but over time, this can start to add up to a decent income for those who are motivated and successful. Much of this income can start to take on a passive nature and can then be invested to make even more passive income. Amazon Associates is just one of many options in this regard.

Rental Property

This, like most of the other forms of passive income, involves some risk. A renter could totally trash a house or trailer, the market could totally collapse and cut the value of the property, or a tsunami could come and completely inundate your investment. All investment involves risk. There is risk to my personal home. This is why I have insurance. After a rental property is paid off, though, everything over taxes, insurance, and upkeep can go into the column of passive income. Even if the property is only partly paid off, the rent that the tenant pays should pay off the debt. It’s probably not a great idea to leverage a huge sum of money for most people, as a market crash could lead to a foreclosure, but investing in real estate can pay off.

For example, if you had a paid-off house that was valued at $100,000, you could probably get anywhere from $500 per month and up in profit, depending upon the local market. Even if it was not paid off, the renters would be in the process of paying it off for you, which is a form of passive income. If you’ve tired of dealing with renters, you could then sell the house for the $100,000 give or take and invest that in something else, so rental property can also be a good way to get passive income.

These are just a few of the ways that people can make passive income on the money that they’ve already put to work. This money never goes to sleep, but continues to work all year round, making more passive income that adds to a snowballing amount over time. As I mentioned in the title of this article, passive income really is the best form of income. Having money work for you is much greater than having to continually work for more money. I’ve got a way to go in building up my nest egg, but as an old Chinese proverb states: The best time to plant a tree was twenty years ago; the second best time to plant a tree is today. Passive income is definitely what I would call making money in pajamas.

DISCLAIMER: I am not, nor do I claim to be any sort of certified financial planner. This article is just intended for general informational/entertainment purposes. Before making any investments, you should contact a certified financial planner. Always remember, past returns are no guarantee of future successes.

Saving Money in Pajamas with Credit Cards?

One of my favorite pastimes is travel. I’ve had the good fortune to visit a wide range of countries over three different continents. I’m hoping to get to more next year. I’ve also been on trips to Hawaii and California at prices that most people could only dream about. For example, I got tickets to LA from my home in the Midwest for a whopping $11.20 each. I also got three of my five nights at a Hyatt House hotel for $0. I paid for two nights out-of-pocket.

How do I do this? I use points that I’ve earned from various credit card bonus programs. This is not for everyone. People with bad credit will not get approved for a card. People who tend not to pay off their bills in full every month should not get approved for a card. Those who only buy what they can afford and then pay it off every month can get some great awards. There are several different options that can help you get to the destinations that you’re looking to get to.

1. Airline or Hotel Co-Branded Cards

These cards are tied to a specific airline or hotel. For example, Marriott, Hilton, and Hyatt all have their own credit cards that give you a certain number of points per dollar spent. They usually pay bonus points when used to pay for a hotel room at the hotel company that the card represents. All of the major US airlines have a co-branded card (or cards) that can help you get to the destination of your dreams quickly, be it Orlando or Oranjestad. Of course trips to exotic locations like Australia or Tanzania might take more points, but they can be had. I’ve flown to Aruba, Denver, and LAX on miles, and I’ve stayed in Honolulu, Aruba, and Anaheim on hotel points.

2. Flexible Point Cards

These are the gold standard amongst those who are really travel hackers. Cards like the Chase Sapphire Preferred or the Citi Thank You Premier fall into this category. Chase, Citi, and AMEX all have their own point systems that allow you to transfer your points into a chosen travel partner (or get cash back). For example, Chase Ultimate Rewards points can be transferred at a 1:1 rate to airlines like United, British, or Southwest, among others. They can also get transferred to IHG (Holiday Inn), Marriott, or Hyatt at the same rate. Only certain Chase cards work like this. I used these cards for my recent trip to see Mickey and Minnie, and they saved me over $1,000. If you’d rather have cash back, some of these cards will offer a bonus of up to $500 after meeting a minimum spend over 3 months. Of course, if you have to pay interest to get the bonus, it’s not worth it, so make sure that you can pay off your account IN FULL each month before applying.

3. Cash Back Cards

These cards come in two major varieties. One is the straight cash back card. The old Discover It card would fall into this category. Basically, users get 1% cash back for every dollar spent and 5% cash back on various rotating categories each quarter that can involve merchants like gas stations, travel, grocery stores, restaurants, etc. The other form of cash back card is the travel reimbursement card. The Capital One Venture Miles or the Barclay World Arrival Mastercard would fall under this category. These pay a cent or two back for every dollar spent, redeemable for a statement credit on travel expenses.

Before getting these cards, it’s important to remember that credit cards can be a very good employee, but they can be a very bad master. Do not go applying for credit cards if you have a propensity to be a spendthrift. If you’re fairly frugal, you pay off all of your bills every month, and you can avoid the temptation to spend money you don’t have just because it’s on plastic, these cards can help you save money on travel or get some cash back on a regular basis. They can get be a great way to get into debt, but they can also be a great way to get some great experiences for a fraction of what you’d otherwise have to pay.

For more information on how to game the system, I regularly read popular travel blogs like

The Frugal Travel Guy and Million Mile Secrets, among others.

Apply at your own risk, but if you’re disciplined, these cards can really pay off.

Saving Money in Pajamas with Haircuts

Building wealth requires making enough income to put a bit away each month. It’s usually a very long-term proposition that can literally take decades.  As I’ve already stated in another post, a dollar a day can really add up over time to be a substantial sum when compound interest and dividends come into play. I’ve pointed out that sites like SwagBucks and CashCrate can help you earn money on a regular basis. I’ve earned well above a dollar per day, much of it passive, from these two sources over the past three years.

Another source of building wealth is spending less than just about everyone else. A good way for men to save money is through haircuts. This advice might not work as well for women, as a standard set of clippers will not help them look all that great. Most guys have no problems cutting their hair really short. Of course, never cutting hair at all can also save money on haircuts.

I read an article on the Mr. Money Mustache site late last year about cutting your own hair and saving some serious bank. When I walked by a set of clippers with a number of different guards that allow you to manage different lengths for your hair and beard in WalMart while visiting family over Christmas break, I decided to pick it up. I’ve gone with a very short hair style in recent years (after going for over a year without a haircut back in 2010), so I figured I didn’t have much to lose. The cost for this clipper set from Wahl (which plasters that it’s made in the USA on its packaging) was a whopping $37. With tax, it came up to about $40.

I figured that I spend about $16 per haircut when a tip is figured in, and I only got one about every 3 months or so. Having my own set of clippers and a mirror could help me get my hair cut more frequently at a fraction of the cost. I would be ahead after just three haircuts, and I’m already at that point. Every time I cut my hair from this point on is just simply gravy, as the clippers amortize to a very small amount. For example, if I get 100 uses out of the clippers, I will pay about $0.40 per hair cut plus a few pennies for electricity. That’s way cheaper than $16 a pop that I would currently pay someone else to cut my hair, and that cost will probably go up with inflation in the next 10 years. I remember paying about $6 25 years ago. Those 100 hair cuts would have cost about $1,600 and many hours in a barbershop. Now, I’ve already spent the $40, and it only takes me around 10 to 15 minutes to crop my top.

Those $1,600 will probably add up to much more than that over time if invested in a mutual fund. Furthermore, I won’t have to sit in a barber shop or salon for many hours waiting around to get called to the chair. While I can’t really recommend this for women, most men could save quite a bit of money in this manner. A few smart moves like this to cut expenses can go a long way toward financial freedom. You could even use your earnings from CashCrate or Swagbucks to pay for your clippers, and that would compound the power of earning money in pajamas.

Top 3 Ways to Earn Money in Summer 2015

Because the educational system is still tied to the old-school agrarian way of life from the pre-industrial period, teenagers and college students, even in 2015, frequently have some time off during the summer. This becomes the perfect time to make a few bucks that can go toward the future or toward college bills. Money that can cut down student loans can be a great step toward financial freedom, because every dollar that’s not spent on student loans is a dollar that can be saved toward financial freedom. When it comes to getting money over the summer, here are three great ways to get ahead.

1. Look for a Job

The oldest way for teenagers or college students to make money over the summer is related to getting a job. Not only can getting a job earn money, it can also earn experience that can be useful after formal schooling is done. Many students have started their working life at McDonald’s, Burger King, Subway, or some other such eating establishment. Many kids today think that they’re above working at a fast food joint, but these jobs can actually be a great way to learn about hard work, teamwork, and paying attention to what superiors say. Many successful people have started out making money this way.

Fast food is not the only avenue of employment. While they get quite a bit of bad ink because of poor pay, retailers like WalMart and Target can be a way to get a foot in the employment world while making money.

2. Create a Job

Not every avenue for income will come from going to a business and having them give you a job. There are lots of successful people who’ve been able to make a substantial amount of money through their own entrepreneurial efforts. There are literally millions of Americans who hate to mow their lawns. Enterprising young folks who live basically anywhere a decent center of population (think a few hundred homes) can make a decent amount of money from doing yard work.

Few people enjoy cleaning up dog messes, yet our furry friends have to do their business in the outdoors. People who are willing to do a bit of dirty work have been able to make a good living. Setting up an ad and getting a few clients could potentially bring in hundreds, or even thousands, over the course of a summer. What’s needed to make money by creating a job is an ability to find a service that people are willing to pay for and then market yourself. Of course, doing a good job and being ready to do things that other people are not really all that keen on doing is an important part of the process, too.

3. Become an Online Entrepreneur

The Internet is much like the wild west. Although it’s much more organized today than it was in the wide-open days of the 1990s, there is still much money to be made online. Setting up a website does not take much effort, and those who do the job well can cash in. Teens and college students looking to make money in 2015 can make some great money.

The problem with the first two recommendations is the inability of many 13 to 15 year olds to take advantage of them. This is where some great websites come in handy. I personally utilize some sites that pay people to search the Internet or complete surveys or other painless tasks. I’ve made over $1,000 on CashCrate in this manner, and I’ve seen another individual who’s been able to make over $150,000 on the site. You’ll probably not come close to making that much, but $1,000 or more is definitely possible. You can sign up for CashCrate here.

My other big online moneymaker is SwagBucks. This site pays in virtual currency that people can then redeem for gift cards to major retailers like WalMart or Amazon. It’s also possible to cash in SwagBucks for PayPal cash. I usually take advantage of this last option, and I’ve been able to cash in at least $25 per month over the past year with a minimal amount of work while watching TV. Why not do something that pays off, rather than playing Internet games that earn nothing? You can sign up for the Swagbucks site and start earning cash here. This is truly earning money in pajamas.

Making money is an important step that everybody needs to start achieving. The earlier you start, the better off you’ll be in the future if you can keep from spending it all while saving it. After all, just a dollar a day can pay off in the long run. Making money at home in your down time can pay off in increased financial stability, and the time to start is now. These three ways to make money during the summer are a great way to start down that road.

 

The Power of a Dollar

A dollar–it’s made up of 100 cents. 100 copper (or copper-looking) coins with Abe Lincoln’s bust constitute a dollar. Many people think a dollar is pretty useless. Of course, there have been those Taco Bell commercials showing that a dollar can pay for a(n admittedly) small meal. I’ve had some comments on this site that have argued that a dollar a day in additional income doesn’t make that much of a deal in a person’s life. I would argue otherwise.

Teens can start making money today on sites like SwagBucks and CashCrate. Some naysayers complain that survey sites are pointless, but let’s get to the real point in these sites. They give people an opportunity to earn real money. Spending a few minutes every day can lead to at least a dollar. As long as this is surplus money for teens or adults, it can be very powerful.

I recently went onto an online savings calculator to see the value of a dollar per day over time. After a month, a dollar a day will add up to $30 and a few cents if put into a regular savings account. A year of earning a dollar a day more than what’s needed to handle expenses will yield a little over $365. Let’s say a teenager signs up for SwagBucks on their 13th birthday and earned a dollar a day, every day for the next three years. That would add up to more than $1,000 by the time they turned 16. This is where the process really starts to get fun.

A simple savings account will pay out about 1 percent (or even less) in interest per year right now. That means that each $100 invested will return $1 over the course of a year (with a few additional cents because of compounding). Once a person has $1,000, they can start to invest in a number of mutual funds. While these are not as “safe” as a savings account, over time, they tend to provide much higher returns. In fact, the S&P 500 routinely returns about 10 percent over a long period of time. A teenager will probably have 50 years before retirement (if they follow the crowd and spend most of what they earn). A relatively conservative portfolio can usually return around 7 or 8 percent over the long haul.**

I wondered what $1 per day would add up to if invested in a fund that paid 8 percent over a 50-year period. By checking with the online savings calculator noted above, a person could start with an initial investment of $1,000 at age 16 (the three years noted above) and then add $30 per month, every month for the next 50 years. If they could average an 8 percent return, which is quite possible based upon past history, their investments would yield a total balance of nearly $286,000 at age 66. This would be a great supplement to a pension, a retirement account, or Social Security.

While $1 per day for 50 years will add up to well over a quarter of a million dollars, an additional dollar per day will double that amount. Every dollar saved every day for 50 years would add another quarter of a million dollars. A teenager who started saving $4 per day, every day, for 50 years would wind up with more than $1 million by retirement age. That’s pretty exciting to think about. If a person could bring that return up to 10 percent per year, the dollar a day plan would add up to more than $600,000 over fifty years. That’s even more exciting to think about. You can go to this Bankrate calculator to play around with the numbers more.

While a get-paid-to or a survey site might not pay all of the bills of an adult, the additional dollar that can be earned can really pay off. A small investment compounds over time and add substantial income during your golden years. Compounded earnings are the best way to earn money in pajamas. If you’re looking to start earning an extra dollar (or five) per day, check out SwagBucks or CashCrate.

**Keep in mind that the long haul is different than any given year. For example, back in 2008-2009, the S&P 500 lost about 1/2 of its value in a very short period of time. It’s since gained back all that was lost and even gone on to new record highs. Many stocks will pay dividends each quarter that can ameliorate some of these losses in the share price, as well. Of course, past performance is no guarantee of future returns, so keep this in mind when investing and consult an investment professional to learn more.

Please note that I could earn a commission should you sign up for some of the programs listed on this site. I, as always, thank you for your support.

Final 2014 Online Earnings Report

I’ve spent the past couple of years writing this blog, with the first post coming nearly two years to the day prior to this one. In these two years, I’ve set online earnings goals. The first year, I came up short of my $5,000 goal. I set a goal of $450 per month in 2014. That was a total of $5,400 for the year. I came very close to meeting this goal during the year.

I started out the month of December with $4,777.11 in online earnings for the year. This is money that I’ve won while sitting in my recliner, while I’ve been in a foreign country doing short-term mission work, and while I’ve been sitting in a hotel room on vacation. This is over and above my regular paid work. I continued earning money in December. I earned through a few income streams. Here is the money I earned in pajamas during December:

Freelance writing: $466.62

Swagbucks: $50.00

Treasure Trooper: $20.27

This brought my total earnings for December up to $536.89, which was over my monthly earning goal by just over $86.  When I combine this money with the more than $4700 I’d earned through November, my final earnings for 2014 were exactly $5,314. This was just $86 less than my goal for the entire year, which was not terribly shabby, if you ask me. If I am able to keep this up for the next 15 to 20 years, it will definitely add to my retirement funds.

I am not planning to keep a diary of my online earnings after this point, but I think that I’ve at least partially been able to show that, yes, it is quite possible to make some money on the Internet without leaving home. While few people would be able to live on what I’ve made as a main income, this money definitely provides a nice supplement to my main job. I will continue to post other ideas for making money in the future.

November Earnings Report

November was one of the slower months of the year when it came to my online earnings. I continued to make some money, but the amount was a bit lower than most other months this year. I inched closer to my online earnings goal for the year by earning:

Freelance writing: $268.67

Swagbucks: $50

MTurk: $6.30

These earnings added up to $324.97, and this monthly total has my annual online earnings up to $4777.11, just over $600 short of my annual goal, which is definitely within site based upon some of my previous monthly earnings totals. I’ll be sure to update my earnings one final time before the end of the year to show whether or not I’ve made my goal.

I’ve Earned $1,000 with CashCrate

Earning money on the Internet without leaving home will usually require a few different income streams. One of the earliest income streams I found was the Get-Paid-To website CashCrate. Some people might wonder if CashCrate is a scam. I can definitely verify that the site is legit. Not only does it pay, I’ve been able to earn more than $1,000 in just over two years dealing with the site. Here’s the proof–a screenshot of my earnings page:

Here's the proof that I've made $1,000 on CashCrate

Here’s the proof that I’ve made $1,000 on CashCrate

CashCrate users can earn money in a variety of ways. Checking in on the site pays $0.03 per day, and there are frequently videos available to watch at $0.02 per pop. These are good to work with while doing other things. Multitasking can add to your stash of money over time. Filling out surveys and completing cash offers are more lucrative. CashCrate also has a solid referral program that can pay dividends for those who work at it.

New users can sign up for CashCrate and get a $1 bonus for their trouble. Payouts on the site start at just $20, and I’ve earned anywhere from the minimum to $300 in any given month. Your earnings will vary should you sign up, but I’m far from the leader as far as earnings are concerned. I’ve seen one individual with nearly $160,000 in earnings and another with about $70,000. While you will probably not get anywhere near this level, earning a few bucks a month for extra spending money or saving can be pretty easy to accomplish. Of course, perseverance is necessary, because sometimes it can be difficult to qualify for some of the surveys. Signing up friends and family can also pay off. I must confess that I’m always happy to cash the check I get from CashCrate. If you’re looking to earn more money without leaving home, sign up and give CashCrate a try.

**Please note that I could receive compensation should you sign up for the programs reviewed on this site. Should you choose to sign up, I thank you for your support.