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May and June Earnings Report

I’ve been keeping up with monthly earnings reports for the past year and a half on this site, but alas, I have dropped the ball over the past month. Last month, I was away from home more than I was home, and my busyness kept me from posting a monthly report. Therefore, I’ve decided to combine the past two months into a single report that covers May and June. In case you haven’t read my previous updates, I’d earned $2,201.51 over the first four months of the year as I worked toward my ultimate goal of $450 a month ($5,400 for the year.)

So, here are my earnings from the past two months combined:

Swagbucks: $50.00

Cashcrate: $86.85

Hubpages: $54.30

Qmee: $1.62

Bubblews: $50.07

Freelance Writing: $460.60

TOTAL from May and June: $703.44

Total earnings for the first half of 2014: $2,904.95. I am nearly 54% of the way toward my goal of $5,400 in online earnings over the course of this year. I would point out that I’ve written about Bing Rewards on this site before. I continue to use this site, earning around 26 points per day through easy searches. I’ve been using the earnings for Swagbucks that can be transferred into PayPal cash and frequent flyer miles to keep my accounts current so that I don’t lose any miles. You won’t get rich on Bing Rewards or Swagbucks quickly, but they can definitely add a few bucks to your monthly income.  My hope is to make a few more bucks on here for July than the past few months to get ever closer to proving that I could fully fund an IRA on side Internet work. Summer is still in full swing, so find out how to earn some money on the side during summer here.

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April 2014 Earnings Report

As I’ve already published on this blog, I’m trying to make $5,400 through online activity this year. Through March, I was well on the way to achieving this goal. I’d earned $1,743.20, which is nearly up to 1/3 of my annual goal. I continued my work during the Month of April. Here are my earnings for April 2014:

Freelance Writing: $432.48

Swagbucks: $25.00 (This includes 500 free Swagbucks from Bing Rewards)

Qmee: $0.83 ( A review of Qmee will be coming shortly, but you can sign up for Qmee here.)

TOTAL EARNINGS for APRIL 2014: $458.31

Total earnings to-date in 2014: $2,201.51

I am now well over 40% of my goal for the year with 66% of the year left to earn the remaining $3,300. This $450 per month is a great goal, because it could come very close to fully funding a Roth IRA for retirement.

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March 2014 Earning Money in Pajamas

My goal for earning money in pajamas is three months in for 2014. This year, I’m well ahead of this time last year. Through March 2013, I’d earned $638.28. That was just over $200 per month last year. I fell short of my $5,000 yearly goal. This March, I made almost as much as I made in the first three months of the year combined last year. My goal for the year is $5400 ($450 per month). Every month I go over my monthly goal gets me closer to the ultimate goal for the year. So, without further ado, here is my earnings summary for March 2014:

Freelance Writing: $634.54

Swagbucks: $25

Bing Rewards: $3

As is apparent from the summary, I was able to cash in $662.54 for March 2014, which was nearly $25 more than my January-March earnings last year. When added to the income I’d already made for January and February, I’m now up to $1743.20 for 2014, which is around $400 more than I’d need to be on track to meet my annual goal. So, until next time, keep earning money in pajamas, and I’ll continue to do so as well. Sign up to keep up with my progress.

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Online Earning Report–February 2014

I’m now in my second year of tracking my earnings online to help people see how it can be done. I’ve now earned over $5,000 in the past 14 months. I set a goal of $5,400 for 2014. I started out the year very strongly, earning $597.33 for January. I continued my work during February. This month is the shortest of the year, so it can be difficult to keep up with online earnings. I still did pretty well. Here are my earning streams. Unfortunately, little of it was passive income, although I’m building up some accrued income that’s not been paid out yet and should be in the next month or so.

Freelance writing: $480.33

Swagbucks: $25.00 (sign up for Swagbucks here–I could earn a referral commission)

Bing Rewards: $3.00 (sign up for Bing Rewards here–I could earn a referral)

MTurk: $3.00 (sign up for MTurk here–there is no referral program with MTurk)

My total earnings for February were $511.33. When added with my earnings for January, I’ve earned $1,108.66, which is 20.5 percent of my annual goal with just 16.6667 percent of the year completed. That means I’m ahead of my goal for the year.

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Is Bing Rewards a Scam

NOTE: Bing Rewards is now Microsoft Rewards. I still use them and earn Amazon gift cards with them, but there is no referral program as there was before. They no longer allow users to get Swagbucks as a reward–hence my use of Amazon gift cards.

One of the first things that I wonder when I find out about another money-making site is whether or not its a scam. I’ve been seeing ads for Bing Rewards for quite some time on Swagbucks (you can sign up for Swagbucks here), and I wondered if Bing Rewards is a scam. I must confess that I just signed up for Bing Rewards because there was a limited-time offer of a 100 Swagbuck (basically $1) sign up bonus.

Earning Bing Rewards Points 

The BIng Rewards program works like many of the other search and earn sites. It is run by Microsoft’s search platform. You perform searches, and you get one point for every two searches that you make through Bing. Unlike a site like Swagbucks, you’re basically limited to 15 points for searching each day until you get to 750 points and Gold status. Then your earning ability goes up to 20 search points per day.

Cashing in Bing Rewards

Rewards range from discount online coupons to the e-gift cards that are familiar with Swagbucks. I don’t usually post a review on this site until I’ve actually been paid by the program under review. This review is the same. I was able to cash out for a $3 Amazon gift card, which I promptly applied to my account. My gift card balance went up by $3, and I used it promptly to buy a book that I was planning to get anyway.

Unlike Swagbucks you cannot get PayPal cash directly from Bing Rewards. The $3 Amazon card that I cashed out required 340 points. After you’ve cashed out a reward and earned 750 points on the site, you are bumped up to Gold Status (the highest available at this point), and you can then get a discount on all of your redemptions. The $3 Amazon card drops from 340 points to 330 points. I’ll have Gold Status by that point and will have to pay only 475 points, rather than the normal 525.

Maxing out Bing Rewards Quickly Every Day

So, to answer the question, is Bing Rewards a scam, no, it is not. It is a legitimate way to make some side income online. It may seem like a very time consuming way to make cash, but it really only takes about a minute a day. When you perform your first search, the site posts some related searches on the right-hand side of the page. You may have to scroll down a bit for these, but they are frequently on the top right of the page. Clicking one of these one after the other will cause the meter to go up very quickly.

Here is my dashboard from Bing Rewards. It shows my last cash out, my goal, and my lifetime earnings.
Here is my dashboard from Bing Rewards. It shows my last cash out, my goal, and my lifetime earnings.

BIng Rewards Is NOT a Scam

Bing Rewards can be a very good way to earn a reward of $5 toward Amazon gift cards each month. You can sign up for Bing Rewards here. Please note that I am eligible for a referral bonus should you use my link. I thank you should you choose to do so. You can still earn by signing up on your own. I have used this site, and will continue regardless. If you want to read up on Swagbucks you can read my Swagbucks review here.

Good luck as you continue to earn money in pajamas.

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Five Ways That Teens Make Money during Summer

Teens make money during summer via many side hustles online.
Photo Credit: FirmBee via Pixabay (public domain)

Summer is a great time of the year for kids all over the US. Most students in those districts that have not gone over to year-round schooling get to take nearly three months away from book learning. A great time for teens to go to the local pool, golf course, tennis court, or mall is summer. Of course, all of these things take money. It is not too early to start thinking about the ways that teens make money during summer.

The question then comes about, who should pay? Many parents have enough to fund their kids’ fun during the summer, but with aftereffects of the Great Recession, many families have budgets that are quite tight. There are several ways for teens to make money to pay for their fun and (hopefully) save some money for college, a car, or a home. Here are just five ideas for teens to make money in the summer of 2014:

1. Sign up for a GPT Site or Two

There are many sites up online that will allow any American over 13 to fill out surveys and watch videos to make money online. Most jobs require an employee to be at least 16 or to have parental permission if 14 or 15. These sites can let younger students start to get an entrepreneurial start.

A couple of the more common GPT sites are CashCrate and Treasure Trooper. Both have a long history of paying literally millions to users. Of course, most people will only earn about $50 or $100 per month if they work at these sites, but they pay without having to go out and work for someone else. They can also be used in free time in conjunction with another job.

You can sign up for CashCrate here. I have a more extensive review of the site here, as well to show how easy it is to make money on CashCrate. You can also sign up for Treasure Trooper here. I have reviewed Treasure Trooper here. Join the blog to get updates.

2. Sign up for SwagBucks or Another Paid to Search Site

Another way that teens earn money during summer (or at least gift cards) is by signing up for SwagBucks or another such site. This site is open to anyone who is at least 13 years old. Users can perform tasks like searching the web through the site and earn virtual currency known as SwagBucks, which can then be used to purchase a number of items including gift cards or actual cash in a PayPal account. I’m currently using my SwagBucks earnings to buy stock via Loyal3. These earnings from Swagbucks should pay off over time.

Gift card redemption options are at great retailers and restaurants. Among the leading options are Amazon.com and WalMart. e-Gift cards from the latter can be used in the stores, so they are just as good as cash. Also, there are options to redeem a few SwagBucks for discounts at local attractions like golf courses. I have a more lengthy review of SwagBucks here.

GiftHulk is another similar site that allows users to earn from searching the web and watching videos, among other things. I’ve earned PayPal cash from this site, and teens make money during summer from this site as long as they’ve reached 13 years of age. You can sign up for GiftHulk here.

Teens who make money and save will be more likely to balance their budgets in the future.
Teens who make money and save will find it easier to balance their budgets in adulthood.

3. Get a Part-time Job

This recommendation can sometime be easier said than done. Many businesses have cut back on the traditional summer hires. What are some good part-time opportunities for students? Many local retail outlets or fast food restaurants might be in the process of hiring for summer.

Those who like to play golf or swim might be able to land a job at one of their favorite places of all. These establishments are frequently seasonal, so they hire specifically during the summer. Those with a full-time job are not likely to apply, so students have a great opportunity to land their first paying gig.

4. Start a Business

One of the best ways that teens make money during summer is through doing something that they like and using it to start a business. High school students can start summer jobs and make decent money in the process. Cutting grass and babysitting are two great methods for teens to make money during the summer. Many of the kids who need babysitting only need it during summer months. Make sure to charge the going rate and do a good job so that you can get repeat business.

5. Sell Lightly Worn Toys or Games

Online businesses like Amazon and eBay allow just about anyone to set up an account and sell items to the world. Most teenagers have no need for the toys that they had in their earlier years. People also start to like different types of video games as they get older.

It is very easy to set up an account on an online dealer like Amazon or eBay with a parent and sell these items. While you will not get the full retail price, you can get some money that can go to something more desirable for a teenager.

Lots of Teens Make Money During Summer So Get Started Now

There are tons of ways that teens make money during summer. Some of the options allow people to actually make money in pajamas without leaving home. Some of the opportunities listed above are seasonal. Others, like CashCrate, Treasure Trooper, and SwagBucks can earn some money year-round. The sooner one signs up, the more quickly they can start to earn money.

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