Pennies

Get Excited About Pennies

It's time to get excited about pennies!
Pennies add up to build dollars, and dollars add up to build wealth

My kids get excited about pennies. If they find one on the ground, they are sure to pick it up. I think that most kids are like this. I know that I was when I was their age.

As we get older, however, that excitement tends to fade. A penny by itself will buy pretty much nothing. Most adults tend to think of pennies as being pretty worthless. They are anything but. I’ll admit that pennies still excite me!

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Pennies are important building blocks. Five of them make a nickel. Ten make a dime. 100 make a dollar. When we get to dollars, we’re talking real money. Each and every penny that we find and pick up or earn in some manner is building block towards a better financial state of being. That’s why it’s important to get excited about pennies.

Think Of Pennies As Stepping Stones

I’ve already noted that pennies are building blocks. They can be important stepping stones to getting where you want to be. A while back, I read an article that got me thinking in this direction. Rather than pennies, it stated that millionaires are made $10 at a time.

Sometimes, we can make lots of pennies really quickly. This happens when we’re at work. When I started working, minimum wage was $4.25. I had it figured out that I made about 7 cents a minute at that rate. This meant that I earned a penny about every 9 seconds. I’d annoy some of my co-workers by stating things like, “I just made $0.21” after three minutes on the clock.

While $0.21 is not much to get excited about, the addition of many $0.21s over time started to build up. So much so that I had about $7,000 in the bank after a couple of years of working at a minimum wage job. In the interest of full disclosure, I’ll admit that I was in college and living at home. Still 7 grand for working part-time for minimum wage at McDonald’s wasn’t bad.

Many of my coworkers complained about the poor pay, and it was poor. However, I looked at my income in an optimistic manner. It gave me some freedom to do the things I wanted to do. It did’t take much for me to get excited about pennies.

The more pennies we make, but more pennies we can save. It was Ben Franklin who said that a penny saved is a penny earned. While pennies were worth more in Franklin’s day, the basic premise still holds true.

Get Excited About Pennies: They Help Build Passive Income

I’ve stated many times that my favorite type of income is passive income. I think this is the case because passive income comes to me whether I put in any effort or not. It’s just keeps rolling in.

Passive income trickles in whether I’m sleeping or working hard. My passive income from dividends started out at $0.02 a day when I first started tracking it. Rather than get frustrated that I only made $0.64 in a month, I looked at the $0.02 a day that I made as the start of something great.

Now, I’m making much more in terms of passive income, even a dollar or two a day in most months. It takes time and, yes, pennies, to build this passive income. My passive income growth is documented by my monthly dividend income posts. It’s been growing at a good clip.

Dividends are usually stated in pennies. With the exception of companies with really high stock prices, most quarterly dividends come in at less than $1 a share. As an example, I own some shares of AT & T. These pay me $0.49 a quarter. That’s 49 pennies, quarter in and quarter out.. The dividends from one share won’t pay for much, but if reinvested, these pennies can start to build momentum into something pretty amazing.

Those who own as few as 180 shares of AT & T could pretty much pay for the lowest priced cell phone plan from Cricket Wireless (owned by AT & T), which is $30 a month. That’s a pretty awesome concept, if you ask me. This would effectively constitute free cell phone service, all from a buildup of pennies.

Over time, enough pennies could actually fund your entire lifestyle. That’s really something exciting.

How To Make A Few Extra Pennies

Now that you’ve read up on how pennies are important stepping stones to the life that you want, you might wonder how you can make even more. There are pretty easy ways that you can make a few extra pennies online in your spare time if you don’t want to get a part-time job flipping burgers.

I’ve written several articles for the online freelance site Textbroker. For most of these articles, I’ve earned 1.4 cents a word. These pennies have added up to several thousand bucks over the past five years or so. Many times, I can average more than $20 an hour if I find jobs that I can complete easily.

Not everyone can write coherently though. I also have recommendations for these folks. There are many ways that you can make money online. Two of my favorites are Swagbucks and EarnHoney. I can earn by searching the web and answering some easy surveys on Swagbucks and by letting videos play passively with EarnHoney. It’s a few pennies here and there, but I cash out some of these pennies each and every month.

With the money I’m bringing in from letting videos play, I’m buying shares in stocks like AT & T that pay me even more pennies. I’ve also put this money toward paying off debt in a more accelerated fashion. This is what allows me to get excited about pennies. I’m improving my financial situation with each and every penny I get.

I’d urge you to get started looking for ways to pick up a few dollars worth of pennies each month. How much could an additional $25, $50, or even $100 each month help you out? It takes a new mindset to think of pennies as worth the trouble. Get excited about pennies!

Be Sure To Follow My Updates

If you’d like to follow my progress each month, be sure to go to the top of the page and sign up for updates. You can also follow me on Twitter.  I’m now above 300 followers, and I’d like to get more than 400 by the end of summer. You can help!

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Disclaimer: This site has affiliate links. If you decide to sign up with one of these affiliate links, I may be compensated. I appreciate any support you might provide.

Pennies

Dividends: Passive Income From June 2017

The month of June 2017 is over. The summer is about half over. That’s not cool, but what is cool is the passive income that I get from dividends each and every month.

The end of the month is a great time to look back and assess where I am. I look at my dividends and where they stand in relation to the same month last quarter and the same month last year. This gives me a good idea if I’m making progress toward my goal of building up passive income. As I’ve noted many times, passive income is the best income.

I like dividends because they come in whether I’m at home or at work. They come in whether I’m awake or asleep, which means I can really earn money in pajamas. At home or on the road? It doesn’t matter. This passive aspect of dividend income is one that I really like.

I own some great companies, and these companies sell goods or serve clients around the world on a daily basis. I can take Christmas completely off, and I’ll still have dividends rolling in from these companies. In June, I earned from several companies and a couple of funds. Here are the dividends that I earned during the month of June.

Dividends For June 2017

Here are the specific companies and funds that paid me a dividend during the month of June 2017:

Kroger Co. (KR)                                                                                                 $2.40
Southern Company (SO)                                                                            $17.40
Johnson & Johnson (JNJ)                                                                              $8.40
Realty Income Corp. (O)                                                                                $5.28

Total Dividend Income From IRA                                                            $33.48

JP Morgan Equity Income R5 (OIERX)                                                   $1.96
Cohen and Steers Realty Shares (CSRSX)                                          $21.79

Total Dividend Income from 401k                                                          $23.75

Total Dividend Income for June 2017:                                            $57.23

This dividend income is the highest that I’ve earned thus far this calendar year, and I must say that I’m pretty happy with it. Of course, this much passive income would not go far, but it is another step in the right direction.

Year-To-Year Comparison

I like to look at my monthly dividend income and then compare it with the amount that I had a year previously. Again, this is a great way to show me if I’m on the right track.

In June 2016, the companies that I owned at the time paid me $18.82. It’s pretty evident from a comparison that I more than trebled my dividend income over the past year. I’m thrilled any time that I see such large increases on a year-over-year basis.

Passive Dividend Income Builds Up Slowly But Surely
My dividends continue to build slowly, but surely.

The companies and funds that I own have now paid me $206.64 for the year. This compares with the $61.60 that I had earned at this point last year. My passive income has increased by more than 200 percent in just a year.

Furthermore, I’m now on track to earn $454.05 over the next 12 months in my traditional IRA account. This would buy me about 22 hours and 45 minutes of freedom over the next year without taking into account the dividends I earn from my 401k funds. I track this based upon having to replace $20/hour. I’m getting up close to the two hours a month level.

I can’t believe how far this has come from the $0.64 I received from Apple back in August 2015. This was the first of the dividends that companies have paid me, and the amount has only gone up from there. How was your dividend income last month? I’ve updated my monthly dividend record to reflect my dividends from June 2017 if you want to check out my progress.

Disclaimers And The Like

If you’d like to keep up with my progress, be sure to sign up for updates in the email signup box near the top of the page or via the popup that asks you to sign up. You can also follow me on Twitter.

Disclaimer: I am not a professional financial advisor. I intend this information for informational and educational purposes only. Perform due diligence before investing in any equities. See my disclosures page for more information. I’m long KR, O, SO, JNJ, CSRSX, and OIERX.

 

Pennies

EarnHoney Review: Can You Earn Money In Pajamas?

Back when I started working on Earn Money In Pajamas, one of the things that I was really interested in was making money online. Millions of Americans live paycheck to paycheck. This makes extra money a must. Side hustles are a great way to make some additional spending (or saving) cash. I’ve reviewed several websites that allow users to earn money without leaving home. Here is one of the newer sites that I’ve found. Read on for my EarnHoney review. Please note that some of the links on this page are affiliate links, so I may be compensated should you sign up using them.

EarnHoney is, in some ways, much like many of the other sites that allow you to earn money online. In other ways, it’s different.

Signing Up For EarnHoney

What EarnHoney review would not discuss the ease (or lack thereof) of signing up for the site. Getting an account on EarnHoney is quite easy. Basically, you need an email address and a password. A username/account number are auto-generated by EarnHoney. There was no request up front for an address or birthday, so theoretically, a 10-year-old could sign up. Once you put in this information, you’ll be able to get started earning money in pajamas. There is a “survey” that you have to fill out before getting access to other surveys. I’ve yet to do it, and I’ve already cashed out.

Please note that only residents of the US can actually earn money on EarnHoney right now. People from other nations can sign up, but they will not have any offers available to them. Since I’m a resident of the US, I’m good to go here.

How Can You Earn Money On EarnHoney?

There are several options when it comes to earning money with EarnHoney. You’re not actually earning cold, hard cash, but rather a digital currency known as HoneyDollar$. You can use these to get cash, but I’ll go into that in a bit.

EarnHoney review of HoneyDollar$ earned
Here is the HoneyDollar$ page that shows how much you’ve earned

This is the earnings page, and it’s an important part of this EarnHoney review. If you’ll notice, it shows how many HoneyDollar$, also known as HD$, I started today with. It then goes into how many additional HoneyDollar$ I’ve earned today with a breakdown of how I earned those HoneyDollar$.

Now for how exactly you can earn some ducats on EarnHoney. If you’ll look at the left edge of the picture above, you’ll see “Earn” with five options below it. The offers are much like some of those available on other similar sites like Swagbucks (my personal favorite). Think in terms of Peanut Labs if you’re familiar with Swagbucks. To be quite honest, I have not yet gotten to the “Give Opinion” part of the equation, as I’ve not yet given the information necessary to access more surveys.

Review of Ways to Earn Money Watching Videos On EarnHoney

What I have used to earn money on EarnHoney is the Buzz TV, Watch, and Play Games options. There is only one game. It’s an addictive 2048 game that requires you to move tiles around a grid to try and multiply the numbers up to 2048. I’ve not been successful at getting to 2048, but I have earned money from it. The money comes from ads that show while your playing the game.

The Buzz TV and Watch links basically allow you to watch videos with ads at the beginning of them. Advertisers pay EarnHoney for showing ads to the site’s users. EarnHoney then returns some of this income to those who watch.

Earn passive income with Buzz TV
Buzz TV is a way to earn passively.

I’ve been letting the auto videos play to make most of my HoneyDollar$ thus far. You click the link, and then get sent to a page with a video that gives instructions of where to go. If you want to skip the instructional video, you can just clink on the “Go There Now” link. This will take you to either a Facebook page with a link to “Watch Videos, which is pretty explanatory, or a Google search results page. You can literally click on any of the links on the Google page and the videos will start playing.

The coolest things about these videos is the fact that they have an autoplay feature that will keep on keeping on as long as the box is ticked. It’s been ticked automatically each time that I’ve gone in, so I don’t think you’ll have to do anything to get the videos to continue playing.

This is cool because you literally have to do nothing after clicking on a link to watch the videos. They will theoretically play and continue to pay until you hit the daily limit. Then you could start on another of the Buzz TV options. This is about as close as you can come to passive income on the web, and as I’ve noted before, passive income is the best income. This is my favorite part of this EarnHoney review.

How Much Can You Realistically Earn With EarnHoney?

This EarnHoney review would be nowhere near complete without explaining how much you can actually earn on the site. The site claims that you can make between $2 and $6 a day. The earning goes slow, I’ll be the first to admit. You’ll usually get between 0.2 and 0.5 HoneyDollar$ per video or game. One HD$ basically equals a cent. Immediately after signing up for EarnHoney, you’ll get an option to watch an instructional video that pays 30 HD$. It’s all of a minute in length.

However, keep in mind that you’ll earn from the Buzz TV videos without doing anything. I’ve actually earned about $0.10 an hour while taking a nap and taking the kids to the pool. I’ve earned the same watching Mountain Men on The History Channel while letting EarnHoney do its thing.

Admittedly, this is pretty low, but it’s pretty much completely passive. I don’t do anything other than click a link. You could use this money to save up for Christmas presents. It’s also possible that you could use it to pay down debt more quickly. Finally, you could add your EarnHoney earnings to your investment account to allow the passive income to make even more passive income. Remember the power of a dollar and how just an hour a day can add up to some serious money over time.

If you’re worried about the cost of the electricity for your computer, it costs about $8 a year to charge a laptop. A tablet would take even less. You’ll come out ahead of the game using EarnHoney for passive income.

What Can You Get With Your HoneyDollar$?

This section of my EarnHoney review will look at what you can actually get with your HD$. There are basically four options. When you get up to 200 HoneyDollar$, you can get a $2 Amazon e-gift card. This is available only on the first redemption. Afterward, Amazon gift cards come in $5, $10, and $25 denominations. You’ll get a 1% discount by redeeming with Amazon.

Secondly, you can use your HD$ to get a Visa Debit card. These come in the same denominations as the Amazon gift cards, plus $50 and $100 options. You’ll also get a 3% discount when you redeem for the Visa Debit cards.

Third, you can donate your HD$ to charity. I’m not likely to do this, but it is an option. You can only donate 500 HD$ at a time, and you have the option of giving to well-known charities like the United Way, World Wildlife Fund, and the Salvation Army.

Finally,  you can use EarnHoney to get PayPal cash. I utilized the Amazon $2 option for my first redemption to see if it would actually work. It did. EarnHoney pays out twice a week, Monday and Friday. I redeemed on Monday, and got my e-gift card on Thursday evening. It was Friday somewhere, I’m sure! I plan to use the PayPal option from here on out, as I can easily put the money in an emergency fund or an investment account from there after transferring the cash to my bank account. $5 and $25 options are possible with PayPal.

EarnHoney Review Conclusion

So, in the final analysis, what EarnHoney review would be complete without a recommendation or lack thereof? You can definitely redeem your HD$ and get what you’ve ordered. I got my $2 Amazon e-gift card when the site said I would. Therefore, it does not appear that EarnHoney is a scam.

The earning is slow going, as most of the online survey and GPT options are. However, this site is unique among those that I’ve used because it allows you to earn pretty much passively. I can let videos play with ads while I’m cooking lunch or sleeping. This truly is one of the best options for earning money in pajamas. You can sign up for EarnHoney here if you’d like to start earning passively.

Other Reviews For Earning Money In Pajamas:

Earn Cash And Rewards With Swagbucks (I just passed $1,700 in lifetime earnings with Swagbucks)

Earn Money With CashCrate (I’ve earned more than $1,000 with CashCrate)

Earning Money In Pajamas With GiftHulk

If you’ve found this review helpful and would like to get further updates, be sure to sign up to follow the site. You can also follow me on Twitter. I truly appreciate your support.

Pennies

Passive Dividend Income, May 2017

Another month is in the books. May has come and gone. We are now past Memorial Day, which was traditionally the beginning of summer vacation, although many are still in school. The end of the month is a great time for reflecting on how the previous month unfolded. It’s also a good time to look into passive dividend income.

I started investing for dividend income nearly two years ago. I had been reading popular personal finance blogs like Mr. Money Mustache and popular PF books like Dave Ramsey’s The Total Money Makeover: Classic Edition: A Proven Plan for Financial Fitness, which I highly recommend if you’ve not yet read it. (You can click the link above or the image below if you want to buy it and support me just a bit). Just about all of these financial gurus recommend spending less (sometimes much less) than you make and then investing the rest.

Then I came upon the old Dividend Mantra site after reading an interview on Mr. Money Mustache. This guy, Jason Fieber, was in the process of documenting the growth of his dividend growth portfolio with a goal to come up with enough passive income to live off of indefinitely, thus making paid work optional. I thought this was a great idea and bought my first dividend-paying stock in July 2015.

Now, I’m nearly two years into this journey. My first dividend was a whopping $0.64 from Apple. I’ve since sold that stock for a profit to pay off some debt, and I’ve now started emphasizing investment through an IRA rollover. My income has grown from that point, exponentially, in fact. However, I’m nowhere near what I’ll need to pay for my expenses. This is a long game.

Why Passive Dividend Income?

You might wonder why I focused on dividend income rather than total return or guessing which stock might take off like Apple or Google. I like the idea that a dividend is a return of some of the capital that I’ve invested. Companies cannot pay them out for the long run without actually having the cash flow and profits to sustain them.

Companies that have long dividend streaks have increased revenue and earnings per share over time. Some of them have done so through multiple recessions. These are the companies that I tend to like the most. I have some relatively high yielders and some that have low yields. But I like the cash coming in each month.

Passive Dividend Income Builds Up Slowly But Surely

Last month, I was in Europe on a (sort of) work trip. I got two separate emails during the trip that indicated dividends had posted to my account. I can literally be anywhere in the world, and I’ll have income flowing in because the companies that I own make money on a daily basis. Passive dividend income flows toward me no matter what I might be doing at a given moment. My money is working for me, and the more money that I put to work, the harder it will work.

Passive Dividend Income For May 2017

During the month of May, I earned (actually received, as it’s unearned income) dividends from three of the companies that I hold in my traditional IRA,. I also received a dividend from one fund in a 401k plan. Here is the income that passively came my way in May 2017:

AT & T (T):                                                                                      $7.35
Omega Healthcare Investors (OHI)                                $31.50
Realty Income Corp. (O)                                                          $2.11

Total for IRA Account:                                                           $40.96

JP Morgan Equity Income R5 (OIERX)                            $3.14

Total Passive Dividend Income for May:                 $44.10

I must say that I’m pretty happy with this amount, but it should grow in August, as I’ve added to both AT & T and Realty Income since the last ex-dividend date. This means that the monthly payout should be even larger.

Year-Over-Year Comparison

Last May, I earned only $9.18 for the entire month. This means that my $44.10 is a 380 percent increase in just over a year. I can’t complain much about that.

My dividend income in terms of the number of hours of freedom that it will buy me is something I really like to track. I could have bought just more than 2 hours and 12 minutes of freedom in May, based upon my belief that $20/hour would take care of my current standard of living pretty well.

I’ve now earned $149.41 for 2017 to this point. That’s just a hair below $30 a month. My forward dividend income for the next 12 months should come in right around $438.45. This is just short of 22 hours of freedom. I like my job and would probably continue to work should I actually get enough passive income to pay for my lifestyle. However, the ability to scale back would be pretty amazing.

I’ve basically gone from $0 in monthly dividend income to $36.53 on average (based on the $438.45 noted above). This took less than two years. With the reinvestment of dividends and new capital added, this snowball should continue rolling and picking up steam into the future.

How was your dividend income in May? Is it going in the right direction? I’ll be updating my dividend income page to reflect this month’s income.

If you’d like to keep up with my progress, be sure to sign up for updates in the email signup box near the top of the page. You can also follow me on Twitter.

Disclaimer: I am not a professional financial advisor. I intend this information for informational and educational purposes only. Perform due diligence before investing in any equities. See my disclosures page for more information. I’m long T, O, OHI, and OIERX.

 

Pennies

April 2017 Passive Dividend Income

Passive Dividend Income Builds Up Slowly But Surely

The month of April is not quite over yet, but my passive dividend income for April has all arrived in my accounts.  The end of the month is one of my favorite times, because I get to tally up the passive income that I earned from dividends over the previous 30 (or so) days.

April was the first month of the second quarter. This means that fewer companies tend to pay out, which hurts my income from my 401k fund. Regardless, all of the companies that I own continued to work making money for me.

Every share that I own is an ever-so-small slice of the company that issued the shares. In effect, I own 0.0000000001 percent of these companies (or some other such minuscule number). Regardless, I love the fact that they work on the other side of the world while I’m sleeping to make me money.

Regardless of what I do in a given month, I get paid. Of course, I have a regular job and work hard to supplement that income, but it’s good to know that I have a growing stream of passive dividend income. Here are the companies that paid me in April:

Passive Dividend Income For April 2017

Taxable Account:

Coca-Cola (KO)                                                                           $3.24

Traditional IRA:

Realty Income Corp (O)                                                          $2.11
General Electric (GE)                                                                $9.60

401k

JP Morgan Equity Income R5 (OIERX)                        $0.01

TOTAL DIVIDENDS FOR APRIL 2017:                         $14.96

Yes, I earned a whopping penny from my 401k. Not terribly impressive, but better than nothing, I suppose.

Year-To-Year Comparison

Admittedly, not even reaching $15 might cause frustration for many people. However, when I look at this amount and compare it to the same month last year, I earned only $8.90 last year. This means that I increased my dividend income by 68% in just 12 months.

Increases of this size will not continue indefinitely, but they are pretty cool. They also help me build up my passive dividend income. They are important building blocks toward my goal.

I’ve now earned $105.31 so far in 2017. At this point last year, I’d earned only $33.27. This means that my passive dividend income is up 217% in just a year’s time. Pretty cool. Onward and upward.

I have to point out one thing, however. I sold all of my taxable investments over the past month, because, as I noted  previously, Loyal3 is shutting down. As this was my taxable investment vehicle of choice, I sold out and put the money into my Traditional IRA, hoping to cut my taxes for 2017 in the process.

This means that you’ll no longer see some of the common dividend payers on my reports previously. I wanted to let you know why.

I replaced my taxable holdings with more AT & T. This brings my estimated dividend income (not counting the 401k) to $398.90 for the next 12 months. I’m only one more purchase or one more dividend raise from crossing over the $400 mark. Again, pretty cool stuff.

How was your dividend income for April? Let me know in the comments. I’ve also updated my passive dividend income page so you can see the growth of my income over time.

If you’d like to keep up with my progress, be sure to sign up for updates in the email signup box near the top of the page. You can also follow me on Twitter.

Disclaimer: I am not a professional financial advisor. I intend this information for informational and educational purposes only. Perform due diligence before investing in any equities. See my disclosures page for more information.

Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Pennies

Loyal3 Is Shutting Down

Prioritize Your Finances to wind up with a suitcase of money
You won’t be maximizing your money with Loyal3 any more.

Back in 2015, I learned about a relatively new investing platform that allowed users to invest in increments as low as $10 per purchase. Additionally, you could buy partial shares, which made the opportunity even more attractive. This platform was Loyal3.  This actually got me to start investing. Unfortunately, after having used this online brokerage for about two years, I got an email that Loyal3 is shutting down.

Loyal3 Is Shutting Down

This email that I received from the company was a bit of a surprise, but not too big of one. The company did not charge any fees, claiming to make money from marketing the stock of the 60 or so companies that it provided for investors as well as the interest from holding onto cash that was not yet invested in an interest-bearing money market fund.

Loyal3 is shutting down.
Loyal3 is shutting down.

This did not seem like the most sustainable of business models, but because Loyal3 was a member of SIPC, I figured at the time that my investments were safe. I enjoyed the chance to build my investment holdings in small increments over time.

Many in the investing community advocate buying stock in increments of $1,000 or more because of fees that hurt long-term returns. This can make it difficult for small-time investors to begin the process of investing. It can also make diversification a very slow process. With Loyal3, I had as many as eight holdings at one time, built up with purchases that ranged between $10 and $200 for any single transaction.

This was a pretty cool deal.

But now it’s done.

What To Do Now?

Now that Loyal3 is shutting down, what is the small-time investor to do? There are some investing options that might work. RobinHood is one that comes to mind. I’ve not used this platform, but I’ve read about it. RobinHood requires investors to buy full shares, which makes the minimum investment a bit higher.

The email from Loyal3 indicated that those who choose to leave their holdings alone would automatically have them transferred to a new brokerage called FolioFirst. This new brokerage, according to the email, is just for Loyal3 clients. The offerings for FolioFirst accounts will grow to around 200 companies and funds, which is good. Then comes the bad news.

There are still free trades( at least up to 2,000 a month), but the new outfit is going to start charging a $5 monthly fee per account. The minimum investment will now go up to $25 from $10. $5 a month might not sound like much, but it would add up to $60 a year.

Let’s say that a new investor has $50 a month to invest. This fee would mean that the investor would go from paying $0 with Loyal3 to paying $60 with the new FolioFirst platform. That’s a fee that would take up 10 percent of the total investments for the first year. Admittedly, the fee would go down over time as more money gets invested, but it would slow down the growth process quite a bit.

Investors with Loyal3 also have the option of instigating an account transfer to the brokerage of their choice. Option 3 involves selling all shares and then cashing them out.

What Am I Doing?

After getting the email that Loyal3 is shutting down, I decided that I’d opt for the third option. My account has some modest gains. I figured that my $100 in gains would cost me about $20 in taxes at most. Not too bad.

Furthermore, I also took into account the fact that I’m investing for dividend income. With the current size of my account, I’d have to pay about 4 percent of its value in account fees over the next year. That’s more than the roughly 3 percent yield that I’m earning on my holdings.

I’m planning to take the proceeds and invest them into my IRA account with TradeKing. This will provide a positive tax effect because I’ll be able to cut my current-year income by the amount I invest and then save 15 percent of the investment in deferred taxes.

I am planning to make one major purchase or two smaller purchases with the proceeds. This will not have me as diversified as I was, but it will cost me a max of $9.90 in trading fees, which is much less than the $60 I’d lose when looking at the monthly fees that FolioFirst would charge.

I can also buy REITs, telecoms, and utilities that pay higher dividend yields, so my overall dividend income for the next 12 months will probably go up with the purchases.

Conclusion

Loyal3 is shutting down. This is sad in one regard. Small-time investors who are getting started will have one less option when it comes to making small purchases and not having to pay major fees.

I’m cashing out and cutting my current-year taxes by putting the proceeds into a traditional IRA. I should also see a bit of a bump in my annual dividend income as a result.

Pennies

March 2017 Passive Dividend Income

Passive Dividend Income Builds Up Slowly But Surely

Yet another month has come and gone. I don’t like new months for one reason, as they seem to be coming more quickly as I get older. I do, however, enjoy them for another reason, because they give a great chance to look back. One of the best things to look back over is passive dividend income.

As you might already know, I’ve decided to embark upon a path of building a growing stream of passive dividend income. The strategy involves buying stock in a few high-quality companies. These companies have many employees who work hard every day.

They also tend to make lots of money, and part of the money that they make comes back to me in the form of dividends. These are cash payments that I can use for pretty much whatever I want. At this point in life, I’m using them to buy more stock. Which leads to more dividends. Which leads to more stock. And on and on this virtuous cycle should go.

Passive Dividend Income for March 2017

March was a great month for earning dividends. I had several companies and funds that paid out in the month. One was even unexpected. Kraft-Heinz switched up from paying out in the first month of the quarter to the third month. It’s no big deal, but it does make my first month income look smaller. Oh well, first world problem, for sure. Here are the great companies that paid me passive dividend income during the month of March:

Taxable Account

Unilever (UL)                                                                           $0.33
McDonald’s (MCD)                                                             $2.79
Kraft-Heinz (KHC)                                                               $1.72

Traditional IRA

Southern Co. (SO)                                                             $16.80
Johnson & Johnson (JNJ)                                               $8.00
Realty Income Corp (O)                                                   $2.11

401k

JP Morgan Equity Income R5 (OIERX)                  $2.23
Cohen and Steers Realty Shares (CSRSX)            $8.18

TOTAL FOR MARCH 2017:   $42.16

Year-to-Year Comparison

When adding up all of these dividend payments, they come up to $42.16 for the month of March. This is an increase of nearly 210 percent over the $13.62 of passive dividend income that I received in the same month last year.

My dividend income  for 2017 is now up to $90.35 for the year. I was at a little less than $25 at this point last year. My $42.16 in dividend income would have bought me just north of 2 hours of freedom in March, based upon my estimate of needing $20/hour of passive income to keep up my standard of living without full-time work. My monthly passive dividend income page that tracks my progress over time has an update with this information.

How was your dividend income for March? Let us know in the comments.

If you’d like to keep up with my progress, be sure to sign up for updates in the email signup box near the top of the page. You can also follow me on Twitter.

Disclaimer: I am not a professional financial advisor. I intend this information for informational and educational purposes only. Perform due diligence before investing in any equities. See my disclosures page for more information.

Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

 

Pennies

Passive Dividend Income for February 2017

Passive Dividend Income Builds Up Slowly But Surely
The month of February is not quite up, but I’ve already gotten all of my passive dividend income payments for the month.  I always enjoy looking back over the month that was and add up my dividend earnings. Dividends are my favorite form of passive income because they come in whether I have work or not.  As I’ve said many times before, passive income is the best income.

I own some great companies that pay me on a regular basis. These companies sell their wares around the world every day. They have workers who are dedicated to serving their clients, and I’m not one of them.  These workers show up to do their jobs when I don’t have to. I have weekends off, but companies like Starbucks (SBUX) sell coffee each and every day in just about every time zone known to man. This is a really cool concept that allows me to build wealth.

Passive Dividend Income For February 2017

I earned multiple payments in February 2017. Three companies and one fund paid me basically for existing. Without holding you in suspense any longer, here is my passive dividend income for the month that was:

Taxable Account:

Starbucks (SBUX)                                                   $1.12

IRA

Realty Income Corp (O)                                      $2.11
Omega Healthcare Investors (OHI)         $31.00

401K

JP Morgan Equity Income RF (OIERX)     $2.33

TOTAL dividends, 2/17                                   $36.56

By looking at my passive dividend income for February, I was able to earn $36.56. I like to compare my income on a year-over-year basis, and in February 2016, I earned $6.27. This was more than $30 less than my earnings just one year later, which means my passive dividend income grew by more than 500 percent in just one year. I have to say I’m happy with this result. However, I don’t assume that this will continue indefinitely.

It’s evident that OHI was my biggest payer for the month. I don’t really like the outsized income that I get from one company, so I’m hoping that I can diversify more so that my income is not so dependent upon one company.

When I add my January income to my income from February, I’m now up to $48.19 in passive dividend income for 2017. It was June before I passed this amount of income in 2016, so I’m definitely thrilled with this progress

Hours of Freedom Earned

I like to track how much freedom my dividend income provides me each month. I have a forward estimated dividend income of $322.95 for the next 12 months. This means that I now have about 16 hours of freedom built up for the next 12 months.

I argue that I would need to earn $20 an hour to maintain a similar standard of living to what I currently have. This figure is arrived at with the assumption that I would not be paying toward retirement or Social Security. Additionally, I would have fewer expenses associated with work like an occasional meal out and commuting.

16 hours of freedom is the equivalent of 1 hour, 20 minutes a month. If I look at my income from February only, it would have nearly bought me 2 hours of freedom. It’s not quite the 170 hours that I’d normally work for a month, but it’s a start.  I enjoy looking at the upward trend, however.

How was your passive dividend income for February? Let us know in the comments.

If you’d like to keep up with my progress, be sure to sign up for updates in the email signup box near the top of the page. You can also follow me on Twitter.

Disclaimer: I am not a professional financial advisor. I intend this information for informational and educational purposes only. Perform due diligence before investing in any equities. See my disclosures page for more information.

Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

 

Pennies

January 2017 Passive Dividend Income

It’s hard to believe, but the first month of 2017 is in the books. There are less than 330 shopping days left until Christmas. The end of the month is one of my favorite times of each month. It’s the time that I look back and tabulate my passive dividend income for the previous 30 days. As all of my brokerage and retirement accounts are updated, I can now add up how much I made passively in January 2017.

Why Dividends?

I’ve decided to build up a stream of passive dividend income through dividends because they come in whether I work or not. I own some great companies. These companies sell their wares or rent out their space 24/7/365. Many of them do so in many nations around the world. One of the coolest things about a dividend growth strategy is the fact that these companies frequently increase their payments with me doing absolutely nothing.

Passive Dividend Income Can Add Up
A $500 bill, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

My dividend income is admittedly quite low at this point. I’ve been working on building it up for less than two years. Any dividend income, however, is gravy. It’s currently a small snowball that’s building mass over time. This increased mass results from three components. These are more invested capital, reinvested dividends, and dividend raises. Put all of them together, and it should be hard not to see an increase in dividend income over time.  Therefore, to end your suspense, here is my passive dividend income for 2017.

January 2017 Passive Dividend Income

IRA Account:

General Electric (GE)                                 $9.60
Realty Income Corp. (O)                         $2.03

Total Passive Dividend Income:        $11.63

I did not earn any income from my taxable or 401k accounts during January. Therefore, only these two companies paid me anything. This was the first time that I’ve earned a dividend from Realty Income, but I should earn something every month, as this company pays out on a monthly basis. It also just announced a dividend increase of 0.8 cents per month. This increase added a cool $1 to my expected dividend income for the next year and allowed my to pass a dividend milestone.

Year-Over-Year Comparison

My dividend income was well off my record month in December. That’s the bad news. The good news is that it was more than double what I earned in the same month last year.  In January 2016 I only earned $4.48. Therefore, my passive dividend income grew by more than 162 percent on a year-over-year basis. Needless to say, I’m pretty happy with that result.

Additionally, my estimated dividend income for the next 12 months is up to $302.11. I’ve noted before that I like to track my dividend income in terms of the number of hours of freedom that it should give me based on a $20/hour salary. This means that I theoretically have 1 hour, 15 minutes of freedom each and every month. This should only grow over time, so I’m pretty happy about my progress. I updated my Monthly Passive Dividend Income page with these results.

How was your dividend income for January? Let me know in the comments.

If you’d like to keep up with my progress, be sure to sign up for updates in the email signup box near the top of the page. You can also follow me on Twitter.

Disclaimer: I am not a professional financial advisor. I intend this information for informational and educational purposes only. Perform due diligence before investing in any equities. See my disclosures page for more information.

Pennies

Smashing Through A Passive Income Milestone

Passive each Passive Income Milestone takes time

I was just online checking my forward dividend income today. I had neglected to put in a raise from Realty Income Corp that allowed me to smash past a passive income milestone. When I started looking at the dividend growth as a great option for building a stream of passive income over time, the idea that the companies that I own giving out regular raises was one of the top concepts that drew me to this strategy.

A New Passive Income Milestone

I input the raise from Realty Income into my spreadsheet (I’m an Excel guy). I have ten shares, which is obviously not an impressive amount. But the raise put me up over $300 in annual anticipated dividend income.

Admittedly, this is not a huge amount of money. I’m now slightly above $300 in my estimated income for the year. That’s just slightly more than $25 a month.

Figuring Passive Income In Hours Worked

Every month when I give a new passive dividend income report, I look at how many hours of work I could theoretically take off by replacing active income with passive income. Every $100 passive income milestone that I pass effectively gives me five hours of freedom, theoretically for life.

With $300 built up, I’m now at 15 hours if I figure that I would need $20 of passive income for ever hour of work. That’s 1 hour, 15 minutes every single month. I would not need to pay any income taxes up to nearly $73,000 of income if the income  is related to qualified dividends. There would be no Social Security taxes coming out. I would not be putting any money into retirement programs.

That’s quite a lot of money coming out on a monthly basis that I don’t even see. Therefore, my current standard of living would not change much, if at all, if I made $20 an hour.

Isn’t This The Slow Way To Build Wealth?

Some of you might wonder if this is the slow way to build wealth, and you’d be right if you think that it is.  Each passive income milestone seems to take a while to hit; however, this is basically the only way to build wealth.

There are tons of get-rich-quick schemes out there. They generally tend to cut wealth rather than build it. Flipping a house can quickly turn into a money pit if you don’t know what you’re doing. Borrowing money to buy pork bellies isn’t any better. You have a better likelihood of getting struck by lightning than you do of hitting the lottery.

Building wealth is kind of like the story of the tortoise and the hare. Those who try the get-rich-quick schemes might look like they’re getting ahead, but they’ll tend to wind up with less wealth than the steady plodders who put away a little bit of their income on a weekly or monthly basis.

I’m thrilled that I’ve smashed through this passive income milestone, but it’s hopefully just one of many more to come.  What milestones do you use to track your progress? Let me know in the comments.

Also, if you’d like to keep up with my progress, be sure to sign up to get updates in the email box at the top of the page or follow me on Twitter.

Disclosure: I am not a licensed financial professional. Be sure to perform due diligence making any investments. I intend my posts for educational and entertainment value only.

Image Credit: African Spurred Tortoise by Photographer 2008, via Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 3.0