Money Tree

Extra Online Income: Have A Plan For Success

Making money online is one of the main topics of this blog. Extra online income became extremely important to me when my wife quit work to take care of kids. I needed to find more income, and I needed to do it fast.

Extra online earnings can benefit your bottom line.
Photo Credit: FirmBee via Pixabay (public domain)

I had already worked in the fast food and retail sectors, and I knew that they did not pay all that well. My memories also told me that they took up a great deal of time away from home. This was all well and good for a single guy who lived at home. It was not, however, a great idea for a married man with kids.

This need for money drove me to look for ways to supplement my income via the Internet. Over time, I learned about some really good ways to make extra online income. I’ve also found that there are some important goals that make earning money online more sustainable.

Having A Plan For Extra Online Income Is Key

Looking at making some extra income “just because” is a reason to start earning. However, it’s probably not going to make most people sustain their efforts.

At first, I absolutely needed the income to make ends meet. This need to keep my bills paid was a pretty good motivating factor. I still need some income to supplement my income, but this need is not as urgent as it once was. This is where a plan comes into play.

I’ve recently been tracking my monthly extra online income. I have a few different streams that I tend to make money from each month. Whether it’s freelance writing or earning from Swagbucks, I try to make a few hundred extra dollars each month.

It’s easy to make money with Swagbucks. All you need to do is search the web with the site, and you could make a few bucks each and every month that you can use on anything from Amazon.com gift cards to PayPal cash. I’m currently using mine to build up a passive income stream via dividend-paying stocks. These dividend payments might help me retire a bit earlier than I could without them.

Paying Down Debt With Extra Online Income

Another goal, in addition to investing my online income, is paying down debt. Some people might look at this strategy as a form of investing. After all, I’m getting an automatic return that’s equal to my interest rate.

I still have about 26 years left on a mortgage. This is a long time, I know. I also know that I’ll pay quite a bit of interest on that loan over the long haul. While my current interest rate is not all that high, I don’t like the idea of having this debt until I’m nearly 70.

Debt Can Cause Stress
Debt can cause stress!

 

Therefore, I’m using some of my extra online income to pay down my mortgage. In the early days of my loan, most of my payment goes toward paying the bank interest. I remember a previous mortgage that I had at 6.125 percent interest rate (this was a few years ago, but a good rate at the time). About $70 of my initial payment went to paying down the loan. The rest, nearly $400, went to the bank.

I could have paid an extra $70 to $80 a month that first year and cut a month off the end of the loan for each extra payment. It’s not that hard to earn $70 or even $170 a month via online efforts.

While it might seem that answering surveys does not pay well, it might actually pay more than an actual job that you have to drive to. I’ve written about a scenario in which a woman making about $19,000 a year actually earned about $0.64 an hour after deducting expenses that came from working outside the home. In this instance, yes, answering surveys might improve your finances more.

Small Steps Make Big Differences

There are expenses that come from driving to work and dressing the part. If you already have a computer and Internet access, your cost is basically electricity. This could be a whopping $8 a YEAR! to charge. That’s a little more than $0.02 a day.

Just this last month, I paid an extra $14 toward my mortgage from small payments that I earned from GiftHulk and Clixsense. This might not sound like much, and it’s not. However, if I continue to add just $14 to my mortgage payment each month, I’d pay it off nearly 1.5 years earlier than the scheduled payoff date. I’d also save more than $3,000 in interest payments over the life of the loan. I’m sure I could find a better use for $3,000 than handing it over to the bank!

There’s a cool amortization schedule at Bankrate.com that allows you to play with the impact of extra payments. That’s where I came up with these numbers.

Small steps can make a big difference over time. This is why it’s important to have a plan for what you can do with your extra online earnings. Seeing progress toward these goals can help keep you motivated toward achieving them.

Perseverance Is Key With Extra Online Income

My goal is to see these earnings and passive income streams grow over time. If I’m able to do so, my mortgage payoff might come quite a bit quicker than what I’ve listed here. I might also be able to quit driving to work every day a few years earlier than most people–by choice, not by necessity.

You, too, can earn some extra money online, whether it comes from searching the web on Swagbucks or GiftHulk or answering some surveys on a site like CashCrate. There are also many freelance opportunities that can help you earn additional income. What will you use the extra online income you earn in your pajamas for? Having a plan can help you improve your finances, and the quicker that you can improve your finances, the better off you’ll be.

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Money Tree

June 2016 Passive Dividend Earnings

Another month has come and gone, and I made some money in pajamas during June 2016. While I do quite a bit of work from home (or on the road) most months, my goal is to get a higher percentage of that income to come from passive sources. The biggest source of passive income that I’ve decided to work on is income via dividends. These payments from quality companies generally come in on a quarterly basis, and they provide me with additional capital to put toward additional stock in high-quality companies that I already own or that I have on my wants list.

My money can work harder than I can over time. I have to put in effort to earn money, but I have a limited number of hours in the day that I can actually work. My money can work day after day after day, 24 hours a day, 265 days a year. While I have a relatively small trickle coming in these days, I am planning to see this tiny stream grow into a rushing river of dollars in the future. It might take several years to get there, but if I’m able to continue on this path that I’ve started, I fully anticipate that my goals can be reached. The companies that I own paid me on several occasions last month, and without further ado, here is the passive dividend income that I didn’t have to work to earn in the month of June:

Unilever PLC (UL)                                $0.08

Wal-Mart (WMT)                                 $3.02

Kellogg (K)                                                $0.72

McDonald’s (MCD)                            $3.40

Royal Dutch Shell PLC (RDS.B)    $11.63

TOTAL DIVIDEND INCOME FOR JUNE 2016     $18.82

This dividend income might not seem like a massive amount, but it is a record for me. My previous high for a month was back in March, when I received $13.62 from my dividend-paying stocks. This was a 38% increase over just the past three months. This income brings up my total annual dividend earnings up to $61.61. I am now up to averaging a cool $10 per month in dividend income, and I’ve almost passed the $20 mark for a single month. I measure my progress by the number of hours of work that I could theoretically take off were I to replace work with passive income. My estimated annual dividend income at this point is up to $147.57, which is right around 7.5 hours were I to figure that I need to replace $20 per hour (after taxes and retirement contributions that would no longer come out). In June, I could have almost taken off an hour of work at this rate. My hope is that this will only continue to grow over time.

Disclaimer: I am not a licensed financial professional. Be sure to do due diligence before investing in securities. This article is not a recommendation to buy a specific company. It is only for educational/entertainment purposes.

Money Tree

More Passive Dividend Income – T

Today, I had the opportunity to put some more capital to work toward some more passive dividend income that I can earn while in pajamas. I had $150 in additional capital that went into my TradeKing account this morning, and I decided to put it to work. My only regret is that I had to put the money to work on a day that saw a big uptick in stock prices. Of course, prices could go up tomorrow too, and there’s no guarantee that they won’t be 5 percent higher by the end of the week or the month. Prices are volatile, so I decided to put the money to work today and lock in some dividends that should pay off early next month.

In September, I purchased 5 shares of telecommunications giant AT & T. I saw where the ex-dividend date was in two days. I was hoping to add to this position in the near term, so this made my decision a bit easier. Royal Dutch Shell PLC was the other stock on my radar today, and I might try to buy a bit more before their next ex-dividend date if I have some capital to put to work. I had enough to purchase an additional 5 shares of AT & T. My total cost for this transaction was $171.20 with the $4.95 TradeKing transaction fee added in. This purchase brings an additional $9.40 to my annual dividend income based upon the current dividend of $1.88 per share ($0.47 per quarter). I now own 10 shares, and I plan to DRIP the dividends into more shares of T at this point. If the price stays where it is, this should pay of in about 1/7 of another share in early November.

This is nearly $0.80 per month, and it brings my total dividend income to nearly $58 on an annualized basis–nearly $5 per month. This might not seem like much, but it’s a start. If I go based upon an estimate of earning $20 per hour (which is not what I make, but it’s near the average hourly wage for an average American with the favorable tax treatment that dividend payments for middle-class people receives). That means that I can take about 15 minutes off each month, or about 3 hours at the end of the year. Every $20 dollars of dividend income earns me another hour of freedom. And the best part of this income is that I have to do absolutely nothing more to earn it. This is passive income at its finest, and as I’ve noted before, passive income is the best income.

DISCLAIMER: I am not a professional investor. Please consult one before investing in securities. You can lose money on stocks. Past performance is no indicator of future results. 

Money Tree

September 2015 Passive Dividend Earnings

I’ve been putting capital to work over the past couple of months in an attempt to really earn money in pajamas. Stock pay dividends on a regular basis no matter what I do. I could watch TV, sleep, and eat all day long, every day, and the ownership stakes that I’ve paid for in my companies would still pay out. Last month, I gave my first dividend earnings report. I earned a whopping $0.64 from a small dividend from Apple (AAPL). This month, a couple of great companies paid me for owning a small sliver of their operations. My dividend earnings  for September were:

WalMart (WMT): $0.69

McDonald’s (MCD): $1.29

These companies paid me $1.98, which adds up to just more than $0.03 per day. That might not seem like much, but with any luck that will add up to a dollar per day over the relatively near future. That $1 will then multiply to $2, and then $10 each day. All that’s needed is time and more capital to put to work. The best thing about this money is that it comes in without my doing any additional work than the work that I put in to get the initial capital to invest. It’s like a snowball that’s adding a little bit each quarter going forward.

With my earnings from August added in, I’ve now reached $2.62 in dividends this year. I’ve already earned my first dividend for October, as Coca-Cola (KO) has already paid out their third quarter dividend. I should also get a dividend from the Bank of Nova Scotia at the end of the month. October should be another record-breaking month, even though I’m not likely to pay for much more than the dollar menu at McDonald’s with my earnings. From this point forward, my income should start really picking up, though. Passive income is the best income.