Tag Archives: earn money in pajamas

Online Earnings For January 2017

The title of this site is Earn Money In Pajamas. I like earning money while sitting at home and watching TV or hanging out  with the family. I can earn money at home at just about any time that I’m not at my day job. The money that I earn online goes toward investing and toward paying bills. It also goes toward paying off debts.  I’m again tracking my online earnings.

Online Earnings Can Add Up
A $500 bill, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

I used to keep up with how much money I made each month. I set online earnings goals for the first couple of years that I kept this site up. The past couple of years, however, I’ve slipped up on this process. I’ve been focusing upon earning money online, but I’ve been reporting on the money that I’ve made from dividend income.

Dividend income is a great method of earning money in pajamas. I own teeny little slices of companies that pay me a portion of their profits. All I have to do is wake up and get the notification that I’ve earned a dividend.  This is an example of passive income, which I firmly believe is the best form of income.

Online Earnings For January

I’ve also been involved in active income in the past couple of years, and one of the methods that I’ve continued to earn money is via online activities. After giving it some thought, I decided that I might give regular updates to show you that it’s possible to earn money online (in your pajamas) in 2017. Here is what I earned via online activity in 2017:

Swagbucks:                                      $75.00
Freelance Writing:                      $259.60

Total Online Earnings 1/17:  $334.60

I can’t complain. The money that I’ve earned with Swagbucks has gone toward purchasing stock in high-quality companies. The rest of the online earnings that I’ve accumulated over the month have yet to be spent on anything. I would like to invest them, but I need to build up some emergency savings. How did you do via online earnings last month?

Chase Sapphire Reserve Take Two–Approved

Back in August, when the Chase Sapphire Reserve card first came out, I was super excited at the opportunity to get the killer 100,000 Ultimate Rewards points that came with the card after meeting a minimum spend. I’ve referred to this as the “Mother of All Credit Cards.” As I’ve noted before, I was rejected when I applied for the Sapphire Reserve.  I decided then to bide my time and wait a few months before applying again. I intended to wait until February or March because I wanted to make sure that I was able to offset the entire $450 annual fee , which is quite hefty, over two calendar years.  Imagine my surprise when I woke up on Wednesday morning and found out via Million Mile Secrets that the Reserve’s sign-up bonus was about to get halved.

Applying for the Chase Sapphire Reserve

I decided to jump immediately and go ahead and try to get the top travel credit card that I wanted to get in 2017, albeit a bit earlier than I wanted to get it. Applying was the first thing that I did after logging onto my laptop that morning. I sat down and filled out the three pages on the application and then waited on the decision. It seemed that it was taking quite a while, but it was probably less than a minute. Regardless, I was a bit nervous that I would again get the notice of a pending application, which generally means no. I was thrilled, however, when the next page popped up and noted that I’d been approved for the card.

Visa, MasterCard, and American Express
Credit cards via Wikimedia Commons

After I get the Sapphire Reserve in the mail, I intend to start using it exclusively so that I can meet the $4,000 spending requirement so that the 100,000-point bonus will kick in.

What To Do With the Sapphire Reserve’s Bonus

There are several different options when it comes to spending 100,000 Ultimate Rewards points. You could take four round-trip saver flights within the US on United Airlines.  I’ve seen one-way flights from Denver to Las Vegas or Los Angeles for just north of 2,000 Rapid Rewards points on Southwest Airlines. This bonus would take care of nearly 50 one-way flights between many US cities, and could also pay for at least four flights to Mexico from the US on Southwest, depending upon the date and whether any sales are ongoing from your departure city at the time you book. I got four tickets to Puerto Vallarta for about 23,000 Ultimate Rewards points when transferring them to Southwest last year.

It’s also possible to get two round-trip tickets from the US to Europe on Air France/KLM’s Flying Blue frequent flyer program with some of the discounted options that these companies offer from time to time. 100,000 would also be more than enough to get a one-way business-class ticket at the saver level or a round-trip economy ticket to just about any region of the world on United Airlines. These are just a few of the options that you could use to spend this massive cache of points, as they transfer at a 1:1 ratio to some of the leading loyalty programs around.

Additionally, if you’re looking to pay directly for flights, you could get 1.5 cents per point in value by going through the Chase travel portal. This could allow you to get multiple tickets to Europe with some of the sales that have been going on recently. Finally, you could just redeem them for 1 cent apiece and get a cool $1,000 in cash which is a pretty easy way to earn money in pajamas. Keep in mind that the sign-up bonus gets halved on January 11, so if you’re looking to get the Sapphire Reserve and the bonus, be sure to apply sooner, rather than later.  Also, be sure to check out more of my top credit card recommendations for 2017.

$10 Amazon Gift Card Giveaway

Welcome to those visiting from my interview that’s the latest installment of Investment Hunting’s interview series.

It’s the most wonderful time of the year. We’re about halfway between Thanksgiving and Christmas. I’m thankful for many of the blessings that I have in life. This year has been pretty good so far, and I’ve been able to take a couple of trips that were enjoyable cultural experiences.  I’ve also seen my dividend income grow exponentially.

View from balcony at CasaMagna Marriott Puerto Vallarta–by me

In keeping with the season of giving, I’ve decided to give a $10 Amazon e-Gift card to one lucky winner. This can be used toward a present for yourself or someone else. I’m actually going to be cashing in some of my earnings from Swagbucks, and you can earn e-Gift cards or cash by signing up at the site and completing various easy tasks like using their search engine or playing videos while you’re watching TV in your pajamas (or a business suit if that’s how you roll).  You won’t get entered into this giveaway by signing up for Swagbucks, but you can start earning points toward other e-Gift cards or PayPal cash if you do decide to sign up.  Please note that if you sign up with my link, I may earn a commission on your earnings.

Entering the actual contest is going to be pretty easy. All you have to do is sign up to get updates from the website via MailMunch. This is the pop-up that asks you to sign up after you’ve been on Earn Money in Pajamas for a few seconds. I’ve you’ve already X’d out of the pop-up, you should be able to leave the site and come back to get another chance.  Sign up. That’s it. Here are the rules for the giveaway:

Contest Duration:

The contest will run until 12/24/2016 at 11:59 pm GMT. Anyone who signs up before this deadline will be eligible to win.

Contest Prize:

One Amazon e-Gift card code that’s worth $10. The total value of the prize is $10. The winner will be responsible for putting in the code on their own Amazon.com account.

Odds of Winning:

The odds of winning are 1 in however many people sign up for my email list via Mail Munch before the deadline.

How will the winner be selected?

I will count up the number of entries received by the Christmas Eve deadline. Then I’ll input the number of entries into an online random number generator. The first person to have signed up on Mail Munch starting today will get assigned number one. The second will get assigned number two, and so forth. The person whose number comes up will get an email from me informing them that they’ve won. If they do not reply within 48 hours after I send the email, I’ll get another number from the random number generator and repeat the process until I get a winner who responds.

What will you do with my email address (AKA privacy)?

By signing up, you agree that you give Earn Money in Pajamas permission to use your email address for two possible purposes. The first is to get updates from Earn Money in Pajamas.  The second is to put you into contact with opportunities to earn money and/or travel/cash back points (for example Chase or Amex referrals). Names and email addresses are all that might be shared under this arrangement. I appreciate your support.

Book Review–Your Money Map

A few months ago, I was in a Christian bookstore and I decided to check out the personal finance section. Some of the books appeared to be from health and wealth guys who encourage you to “sow some seed” to benefit their ministries. I’m not into that by any stretch. I then happened upon a book titled Your Money Map: A Proven 7-Step Guide to True Financial Freedom. The author of the book was Howard Dayton, and it was published in 2006. The publisher was Moody Publishers, which is pretty far removed from the health and wealth scene. I then decided to pick up the book to see if it was the same as Dave Ramsey’s Total Money Makeover, which has seven baby steps. It did not.

Rather than just giving seven “baby steps” that are singular in purpose and that have to be followed in order religiously, this book shows more of a lifetime journey that a person might take. Both Ramsey and Dayton argue that financial freedom is a process that could take quite a bit of time.

Your Money Map is distinctively Christian in its outlook. Therefore, those who operate from a more secular viewpoint might be more interested in other personal finance books. This book follows a couple that Dayton counseled regarding personal finance and the advice that he gave them through each step of the way.

The book starts out by arguing that all wealth comes as a stewardship from God. Therefore, it’s important to ensure that we are effective stewards with the money that we’re entrusted with. Dayton argues that one of the first steps that anyone should take when getting their personal finances in order is to begin charitable giving toward religious purposes. This is one of the areas that nonreligious people might disagree with Dayton, but starting to give is part of Destination 1 on the money map that’s included in the chapters of the book, as well as the schematic money map at the very end of the book.

Other goals involved in reaching Destination 1 include the obligatory budget and $1,000 emergency fund. These two steps seem to be pretty standard among the community of personal finance gurus. Both are pretty good ideas. Budgeting ensures that you can avoid spending more than you bring in. If you spend more than your income each month, you’ll wind up with a negative net worth if you’re not already there. If you spend less on a monthly basis, you’ll build up a solid net worth over time. It’s pretty simple, actually. Also, stashing $1,000 allows you to pay for any unexpected expenses that might come up–like the busted radiator I had to replace a couple of months ago. Definitely not cool, but necessary. Learning to handle money God’s way is a little outside the realm of personal finance gurus who are not tied to Christianity or another religion.

Steps 2 and 3 on the money map are where Dayton is a bit different than some of the other personal finance books and websites that I’ve read. Most of these other books emphasize paying off debt at the expense of savings. Your Money Map argues that people should build up a larger emergency fund (for one, and then three, months of expenses) while simultaneously paying down credit card debt and all other consumer debts. This blended approach is refreshing to me, because cash flow is important. Having more money available at any given time can help people avoid building up additional debt should an unexpected job loss or other catastrophe occur.

Earning money in pajamas can help you achieve financial freedom.

A possible destination after reaching Step 7on Your Money Map.

Step 4 is related to saving up funds for major outlays like a home or retirement (childrens’ education is optional here). Dayton recommends saving up a substantial down payment for a home so that a downturn in the local housing market does not get a buyer upside-down on his or her mortgage. This is generally sound advice (although I didn’t follow it personally because renting in the markets I’ve lived in has been more expensive than buying–I took advantage of loans with low down payment requirements).

Steps 5 and 6 deal with actually buying the house, paying it off early, and investing additional money outside of retirement accounts, working toward the multiple goals at the same time. Step 7 is financial freedom. The goal of financial freedom is retiring and actually having something to leave as a legacy, be it through an inheritance to your children or some nice gifts to organizations that you feel strongly about. Retirement also means that you have more time to give to endeavors that you feel really, really passionately about.

The story of Matt Mitchell, the car salesman that Dayton counsels, is woven throughout the book. Dayton himself has basically donated his time as a personal finance coach for decades, so he discusses how he walked his pupil through the steps toward financial freedom. I liked how this book showed that you can focus upon more than one thing at a time because compounding is an important and powerful aspect of investing. This is actually not as common in personal finance advice as you might think. Those who start with just saving a few bucks regularly early in life will actually be better off than those who save up more of their income later in life.

I also liked the argument for having a single earner for many couples. After paying for child care and additional clothing, food, and transportation expenses, Dayton shows how one working wife earned an effective wage of $0.64 per hour on $18,000 of gross earnings over the course of a year. Many people don’t look at it this way, but it’s the rationale we used when my wife decided to stay at home with the kids. Low real earnings like this are also all too common. Overall, Your Money Map did a good job of showing how disciplined people can achieve financial independence over time.  If you’d like to check out this book and read it for yourself, I’d encourage you to scroll up and click the link near the top of the page

Disclaimer: If you decide to sign up for various programs or buy products from my referral links, I may receive compensation. You can get the same great benefits from just going to the websites themselves, but I definitely appreciate your support. It’s one of the ways I’m able to earn money in pajamas while helping others do the same. 

Earning Money in Pajamas with GiftHulk

There are many sites on the Internet that allow people to earn money from the comfort of their living rooms and dens. This site has covered several of these. I recently verified another site that allows users to earn money in Pajamas. This site is called GiftHulk, and many of the mechanisms for making money are similar to those available on sites like SwagBucks and CashCrate.

One of the easiest ways to earn the digital currency on GiftHulk, called Hulk Coins, is through search. Users can make unlimited searches, but only one per hour, the first of each new hour, will actually pay out. The searches that pay earn 4 hulk coins, which amounts to about 0.4 cents, depending upon the reward or gift card that the user decides to purchase with the Hulk Coins.

GiftHulk also has a number of surveys that its users can complete. The rewards for completing these surveys can vary quite extensively, from less than 100 HulkCoins to several hundred.  One of the more interesting ways to earn points is through the win link:

Guess the Card
Guess the Card

Users can click on the drop down link for “Guess the Card” and win Hulk Coins. There are three options: the exact card, the number, or the suit, and the number of Hulk Coins that you could win is related to how difficult the guess is.  Additionally, a win will sometimes come with an earnings boost. I’ve been able to get anywhere between 8 and 14 percent in addition to the base earnings. This boost will last for several hours.

Like SwagBucks and CashCrate, there are also options to watch a number of different videos. You will not likely win Hulk Coins for each individual video, but will rather have to watch through a number of videos to earn a varying number of Hulk Coins. These can be watched while sitting around in pajamas. Usually, the number of Hulk Coins that you can expect to win will be 15 or less.

GiftHulk also has a shopping portal that users can click through to major retailers to earn Hulk Coins on their purchases. The retailers include options like Wal-Mart, Target, Macy’s, and Expedia. The number of Hulk Coins that a purchase earns varies based upon the specific retailer utilized. For example, BJ’s Wholesale is currently offering 8 Hulk Coins per dollar (about 0.8 cents), while Verizon is offering 100 Hulk Coins for each dollar spent. This amounts to a 10 percent discount.

When it comes to cashing out, GiftHulk has a very low redemption level for what I would consider “good” awards. Like SwagBucks, users can cash out for PayPal cash, which is my favorite award, as I can use it to purchase stocks that will pay me additional passive income, which is the best form of income.  Some users might opt for an Amazon gift card, or, with the popularity of Pokemon Go, there’s the option of getting gift cards toward this current phenomenon.

Rewards available on GiftHulk
Rewards available on GiftHulk

One award that people might be interested in purchasing that most other sites do not have available is BitCoin. This cryptocurrency is available from GiftHulk. It varies in relation to actual dollars, and it’s more expensive than $5 from PayPal. 5 mBTC costs 6,000 Hulk Coins, which is about $6 when related to the cash from PayPal.

You can buy BitCoin through GiftHulk
You can buy BitCoin through GiftHulk

From what I’ve been able to tell, it seems easier to earn with SwagBucks than it is with GiftHulk. This does not mean that the site is without value. It does pay out, and sometimes, there are videos available when they are not available on SwagBucks. Therefore, it can be an alternative method for earning a bit of money from home. You can sign up for GiftHulk here if you want to give it a try.

Disclaimer: This site publishes referral links from time to time. These will generally provide a small payout for me. You can sign up for the same sites without the referral link and get the same benefits (i.e. payout) that you get from using the link. However, should you decide to sign up with my links, I definitely appreciate the support. 

If this post helped you, be sure to follow the site to get updates. I’m also on Twitter at @moneyinpajamas.

April 2016 Passive Dividend Income

Another month has come and gone. Today is the first day of May, and on this past Friday, I got my last dividend notification for the month of April. I’m now about nine months into the dividend growth investing journey. My goal is to build up passive income over time so that I can enjoy a reasonable retirement in a couple of decades. I believe that long-standing dividend payers who have solid cash flows should be reasonable investments for the long term.

I added a couple of small positions over the past month, but neither of these has paid out a dividend yet. I started pooling my dividends in my Loyal3 account in January, and I reached $10 early in April. I then immediately put that $10 to work in a very small starting position in Unilever PLC. My hope is that my growing stream of dividends will enable me to add to this small start each quarter to start with. As my core positions add more in dividend payments, I plan to increase the frequency of these purchases in UL.

I also cashed out some more funds from Swagbucks and started with a $25 position in Starbucks (SBUX). My hope is to alternate Swagbucks payments and build up some smaller positions. Starbucks does not pay a huge dividend at this point, but the company has been increasing its payout rapidly over the past few years. Additionally, the company is still in the growth phase, so I’m hoping that my eventual yield on cost is much higher than my current ~1.4 percent.

I received three dividend payments during the month of April, so without further ado, here they are:

Coca-Cola (KO):                         $2.95

Wal-Mart (WMT):                       $2.48

Bank of Nova Scotia (BNS):     $3.47

Total dividend payments for March:   $8.90

Dividend income for 2016:                      $33.28

My payment from BNS was subject to a 15 percent withholding tax, so only $2.95 went into my DRIP. This purchased another 0.057 shares of BNS, and it will add about $0.12 to my annual dividend income, although this will vary because of foreign exchange rates. I put the other dividends toward the aforementioned  purchase of Unilever. My current forward dividend income for the next 12 months should be right around $131.67 (although this is possibly a slight bit off because of the BNS forex issue). This way more than the grand total of $0 that I expected in yearly dividends at this same time last year. Earning dividends is truly earning money in pajamas. I do no more work after earning the capital. Then my capital goes to work for me.

If you want to keep up with my progress or learn about my other life hacking achievements and goals, be sure to sign up to follow the blog.

Disclaimer: I am not a licensed financial professional. Please use the information on this site for educational/entertainment purposes only. Be sure to check with a financial professional before purchasing equities.

Disclaimer 2: I may receive compensation if you decide to sign up for any of my affiliate links. This post mentions Swagbucks. I usually get $25 worth of PayPal cash each month from this site, and I use it to buy more stocks that then earn me more dividends that can then go and buy more stocks that then pay more dividends…and so forth. Should you choose to sign up, I thank you for your support.

A Trip to Europe on the Cheap

This is a blog about earning money without putting in time in an office, a fast food joint, or on a construction site. I aim to earn money from home so that I don’t have to spend more time away from the house. I definitely believe that there is more to life than money, but that more money can make life easier and open up options that are not available without it. I believe that a personal finance blog can be a great opportunity to show people hacks that can make their lives better. While earning money in pajamas can improve life, it’s also possible to get some great experiences without spending much. Last year, I wrote a post on how to save massive amounts of money on great trips with frequent flyer miles and hotel points.

Last month, I was able to cash in a load of these points and miles to get a deeply discounted trip to Europe. I cashed in 240,000 American Airlines Aadvantage miles to get six (count ’em, six) off-season tickets to Europe. These came from a couple of American Airlines sign-up bonuses and a couple of bonuses from the old US Airways card. I had long had Paris on my bucket list, and chose to visit the French capital on my vacation. One of the coolest things about the American Airlines award tickets is the ability to purchase one-way awards. Therefore, I decided that it would be a great opportunity to visit another European city in the process. I had to make sure that the tickets were on American Airlines flights (not with a partner like British Airways) because of fuel surcharges that are pretty massive on partner flights. I checked out tickets for my available dates to see if Rome, Barcelona, or Dublin would work. I struck out on each of these, but was able to land a flight to Madrid. Four of the tickets would leave from one city and two would leave from another airport substantially to the east of where I would be flying out of.  The total cost of each of these flights was less than $90–the cost of taxes that are required even with an award flight.

Eiffel TowerObligatory picture of the Eiffel Tour, or Le Tour Eiffel as the French call it, taken from my personal phone. 

Because my flights to and from Europe had what is called in the industry an open jaw, I had to get from Madrid to Paris. I did not have enough points to get the flight for taxes. Therefore, I checked on Expedia, and I was able to land flights for less than $70 each on Iberia Airlines. I could have gotten a slightly cheaper flight on a budget carrier, but these flights nickel and dime passengers with fees for just about anything, including carry-on bags. The total cost of six tickets from the US to Madrid, Madrid to Paris, and Paris to the US was right around $1,000 total. That’s the power of points and miles.

The Royal Palace in MadridThe Royal Palace in Madrid, again, taken by me

I then had to deal with getting lodging while in Europe. I only had a night to spend in Spain before a trip to Paris. I was able to get two rooms at a Holiday Inn Express in the Madrid area for free with IHG points. I then needed five nights in Paris. I was just short of the 280,000 points that I needed to get two rooms at the Marriott Charles de Gualle Airport hotel. I wound up spending $87.50 for the points I needed to put me over the top. Two rooms, one of which was upgraded to a family room upon arrival, for five nights cost a total of $87.50. Altogether, lodging and airfare for six people was slightly more than $1,000. That’s hard to beat. Of course, there were other expenses that added up over the trip, including food, tickets to Disneyland Paris, Versailles, the Louvre, ground transportation, and a day trip to Madrid and Toledo. Overall, it was a great trip, and it cost a fraction of what it might have had I attempted to pay the rack rate. While this was not a result of earning money in pajamas, it was an instance where taking advantage of opportunities that were available got me some great memories at a great discount.

A few credit card applications, meeting some spending bonuses buying stuff that I would be buying anyway, and cashing in the points I earned were all it took to take a dream vacation to Europe. Please note that I only recommend this for people who are able to pay off their cards on a monthly basis, as interest payments can quickly take away any benefit that the points provide and lead to massive amounts of debt. Proceed with caution if you have a spending problem. Also, remember that it’s important to actually have a good credit score to qualify for the bonuses.

If you’ve found this post useful, be sure to follow the blog to get the latest updates.

March 2016 Passive Dividend Income

The month of March has ended, and it’s one of my most favorite times of the month–time to update my monthly dividend income. My previous monthly record was just a whisker shy of reaching double figures (a Hamilton in US currency terms), and as the third month of the quarter seems to be the most popular for companies that pay out dividends, I was expecting to finally hit this level for the first time, about eight months after receiving my first dividend payment of a whopping $0.64 from Apple back in August. The month’s payments did not disappoint. Here they are:

Kellogg’s (K)                               $0.57

McDonald’s (MCD)                   $2.71

Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.B)      $10.34

TOTAL dividend income for March 2016:     $13.62 

Dividend income for 2016:                               $24.38

This total might not seem like much, but it’s money that I didn’t have to work for. It’s also $13.62 more than I was making in passive income just 8 months ago. Over time, this money should start to add up. My payment from Shell went toward DRIPping 0.23 shares in RDS.A. I’m not sure why it went toward the A shares as opposed to the B shares, but this additional purchase should add $0.86 toward my annualized dividend income, which is now estimated at $124.18. Dividend income is passive income, which is the best type of income. My other dividends are sitting in my Loyal3 account waiting to be deployed when I reach $10 or more so that I can diversify into another great company. This should happen next week after April payments from Coca-Cola and Wal-Mart.

During the month of March, I also added $25 purchases toward Apple and Wal-Mart stock in my Loyal3 account and 4 additional whole shares of AT & T in my TradeKing account. These purchases are additional building blocks toward financial freedom. You can open a TradeKing account here and receive a $50 bonus for signing up, funding an account, and making a minimum number of trades.  Some of my capital for stock purchases comes from my use of SwagBucks. Every time I get $25 in PayPal cash from SwagBucks, I transfer it to my bank and then one of my brokerage accounts. You can sign up for SwagBucks here. I earn money just for searching and watching videos, and it’s money I earn while simultaneously watching TV–definitely an example of maximizing time to earn money in pajamas.

Disclaimer: I am not a licensed financial professional. Please use the information on this site for educational/entertainment purposes only. Be sure to check with a financial professional before purchasing equities.

Disclaimer 2: I may receive compensation if you decide to sign up for any of my affiliate links. Should you choose to do so, I thank you for your support.

January 2016 Stock Purchases

With the month of January just about over, it’s time to look back over the month and review my stock purchases for the month. I was able to deploy some capital toward earning my favorite type of income–passive income. I’m a long way from being able to successfully support myself on passive income, but Rome was not built in a day and everyone has to start somewhere.

I made five separate purchases in my Loyal3 account over the month. These took place on three different days. I’m working on topping off all of my companies to have $300 of capital invested in each. I’d already reached that level with my first stock (Wal-Mart/WMT), and I then started to work with the rest of these stocks. My second purchase was Apple (AAPL), and two purchases this month brought me up to $300 invested. I purchased an additional 1.0394 shares of the tech behemoth. This additional purchase added a total of $2.16 of further dividend income going forward.

My next purchase was on the same day as my second Apple purchase. This purchase went toward Coca-Cola (KO) stock. My investment in KO brought me up to $300 invested in this as well, so three of my five companies have now reached this level. I was able to deploy enough capital to add 1.5326 shares to my stash of Coke stock and $2.02 to my forward expected dividend income.

My last two Loyal3 purchases did not allow me to reach my goal of $300 in the final two companies. I was able to buy 0.4468 shares of McDonald’s (MCD) and 0.2248 shares of Kellogg’s (K). At the current dividend rate that these companies provide, the purchases added $1.59 and $0.45 to my forward dividend income, respectively. Overall, these purchases should bring an additional $6.22 to my expected dividend income for the year.

My final purchase of the month came in my TradeKing account (sign up for a TradeKing account, and we could both get a free $50 added to our accounts provided you meet the requirements). With the recent drop in energy stocks, I decided to double down on my holdings in Royal Dutch Shell B shares (RDS.B). I was able to purchase 5 shares at an average cost of $41.04 with the $4.95 transaction expense added into the cost basis. This purchase added $18.80 to my estimated dividend income for the year. While this might be a bit risky as the cost of oil continues to lag near decade-long lows, it’s not likely that Shell is going anywhere and management has gone on record that they will pay the same dividend for 2016. Additionally, there’s not been a dividend cut since the end of WWII, and that’s a long time. When the cost of the black gold finally does go up, there is a chance for some serious capital appreciation in my Shell holdings.

Going forward with these purchases, my total dividend income for the year should be approximately $108.79 (BNS pays in Canadian dollars, so this could be off a bit because of exchange rates).  This is more than $25 more than I would have expected to make just a month earlier. Should I be able to keep up this rate over the course of the year, I’ll add about $300 to my estimated dividend income.

While this might not seem like a huge amount of money, it’s a start to a journey that began with my first purchase of $100 of Wal-Mart stock in my Loyal3 account. I now have positions in 8 different companies and hope to add 2 or 3 more this year to my portfolio. My goal is to consistently add capital to my stash so that my passive income can grow exponentially over time. I’ve set a goal of getting my forward income up to $250 by the end of the year. It’s not quite as much as the number noted above, because I’m not likely to buy much with a yield as high as Shell currently has. This will definitely be money that I’ve been able to earn while doing just about nothing at all while others work (and spend) to make this money for me. How much have you decided to set your goal for? I’ll be updating my first month of dividend income for the year 2016 in the next few days.

Disclaimer: I am not a licensed financial professional. Please use the information on this site for educational/entertainment purposes only. Be sure to check with a financial professional before purchasing equities.

Disclaimer 2: I may receive compensation if you decide to sign up for any of my affiliate links. Should you choose to do so, I thank you for your support.

November 2015 Passive Dividend Income

One of the best ways to earn money in pajamas is through dividend income. This is truly passive income, as other people work hard to make money on capital that I’ve deployed. I worked hard to earn the initial capital, but I do not have to put in any additional effort to earn this income, other than a few clicks of the mouse and a few keystrokes to buy stock. While there is risk inherent with buying stocks, it’s unlikely that every dividend stock that I’ve bought will go belly-up in the very near term. Spreading the risk across several different companies is a great way to mitigate some of the risk.

November is now finished, and one of my favorite posts for the past several months is the post that allows me to look back at the growth of my passive dividend income over time. I’m building this income up with the deployment of $25 here or $100 there into high-quality companies that pay me to allow them the use of my capital. I received two “checks” (AKA dividend payments) during the month of November. While most dividend investors will not set any records during this month of the quarter, I did because of the addition of a new payer. Back in August, I earned my first dividend from Apple (AAPL). I earned a slightly increased dividend from Apple, but I also added income from AT &T (T). Here are the amounts that I earned over the month:

Apple (AAPL)                              $0.71

AT &T (T)                                    $4.70

November TOTAL:                    $5.41

TOTAL for 2015:                        $11.24

The $4.70 payment was reinvested into more AT & T stock, and bought me an additional 0.14 shares, adding $0.26 to my estimated dividend income for the next year. This is dividend growth that is totally passive on my part.  Next month, December, is setting up to pay me a record number of dividend payments with a record income. I’m looking forward to the next update as a result. How much dividend income did you earn in your pajamas last month?