November Side Hustle

March 2017 Passive Dividend Income

Passive Dividend Income Builds Up Slowly But Surely

Yet another month has come and gone. I don’t like new months for one reason, as they seem to be coming more quickly as I get older. I do, however, enjoy them for another reason, because they give a great chance to look back. One of the best things to look back over is passive dividend income.

As you might already know, I’ve decided to embark upon a path of building a growing stream of passive dividend income. The strategy involves buying stock in a few high-quality companies. These companies have many employees who work hard every day.

They also tend to make lots of money, and part of the money that they make comes back to me in the form of dividends. These are cash payments that I can use for pretty much whatever I want. At this point in life, I’m using them to buy more stock. Which leads to more dividends. Which leads to more stock. And on and on this virtuous cycle should go.

Passive Dividend Income for March 2017

March was a great month for earning dividends. I had several companies and funds that paid out in the month. One was even unexpected. Kraft-Heinz switched up from paying out in the first month of the quarter to the third month. It’s no big deal, but it does make my first month income look smaller. Oh well, first world problem, for sure. Here are the great companies that paid me passive dividend income during the month of March:

Taxable Account

Unilever (UL)                                                                           $0.33
McDonald’s (MCD)                                                             $2.79
Kraft-Heinz (KHC)                                                               $1.72

Traditional IRA

Southern Co. (SO)                                                             $16.80
Johnson & Johnson (JNJ)                                               $8.00
Realty Income Corp (O)                                                   $2.11

401k

JP Morgan Equity Income R5 (OIERX)                  $2.23
Cohen and Steers Realty Shares (CSRSX)            $8.18

TOTAL FOR MARCH 2017:   $42.16

Year-to-Year Comparison

When adding up all of these dividend payments, they come up to $42.16 for the month of March. This is an increase of nearly 210 percent over the $13.62 of passive dividend income that I received in the same month last year.

My dividend income  for 2017 is now up to $90.35 for the year. I was at a little less than $25 at this point last year. My $42.16 in dividend income would have bought me just north of 2 hours of freedom in March, based upon my estimate of needing $20/hour of passive income to keep up my standard of living without full-time work. My monthly passive dividend income page that tracks my progress over time has an update with this information.

How was your dividend income for March? Let us know in the comments.

If you’d like to keep up with my progress, be sure to sign up for updates in the email signup box near the top of the page. You can also follow me on Twitter.

Disclaimer: I am not a professional financial advisor. I intend this information for informational and educational purposes only. Perform due diligence before investing in any equities. See my disclosures page for more information.

Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

 

November Side Hustle

December 2016 Passive Dividend Income

2016 is nearly in the books. It’s now officially December 31, and all of my dividend payments for the month, and year, have posted to my various accounts. I can’t believe that it’s been more than a year and a half since I first started the process of purchasing dividend-paying stocks in an attempt to increase passive income over time. As I’ve noted on more than one occasion, I truly believe that passive income is the best income. The more passive income that I have coming in, the better my cash flow, and the better my ability to retire one day will be.

I earn dividend payments no matter what I’m doing in a given month. I’m currently on a trip to visit relatives for the holidays. I’ve had some passive income show up in my accounts while on the road. I’ve read several personal finance blogs that have effectively stated that your money can work harder than you can. This is decidedly NOT the case for me at present, but over time, if I’m able to continue the process of saving and investing in companies that pay me, I’ll be able to have money that works harder than me.

View from CasaMagna Marriott Puerto Vallarta
A view that I’d like to see in (hopefully) early retirement.

How is this possible, you might ask? I get tired. I have to sleep for hopefully somewhere around 6-7 hours every night and then take a nap on some afternoons. The money that I’ve deployed doesn’t have to sleep. I own shares of McDonald’s, Starbucks, and Unilever, and these companies sell their wares all over the world in just about every time zone that’s inhabited. Therefore, while I’m sleeping, my companies keep on making money for me, a small percentage of which will come to me in the form of dividends. I occasionally get sick. My companies still make money and pay me from their income. It’s a pretty good deal, if you ask me. In the month of December, I did better than I’ve ever done. Without dragging on the suspense any longer, here are the payments that I received in December:

Taxable Accounts:

Starbucks (SBUX)                                                                  $0.68
Unilever PLC (UL)                                                                 $0.26
McDonald’s (MCD)                                                             $2.10
Coca-Cola (KO)                                                                      $2.14
Kraft-Heinz (KHC)                                                               $0.86
Royal Dutch Shell PLC (RDS.A)                                    $0.42

IRA

Southern Co. (SO)                                                             $11.20

401(k)

JP Morgan Equity Income R5 (OIERX)                  $8.11
Cohen and Steers Realty Shares (CSRSX)         $40.99

TOTAL Dividend Income in December:          $66.76

This total of $66.76 was by far and away my highest dividend income ever in a single month. I had not been including income from my 401(k) account, but decided that there were dividends coming in through it and that it would be a good idea to include it since I’m tracking dividend income. The dividend income that I reported last year was only $9.67. Had I included my 401(k) income, it would have raised that amount to $29.55.  My December 2016 income therefore more than doubled over the amount I received the previous year.

My income of $66.76 for December increases my total dividend income for the year to $241.61 if I go back and add in my 401k dividends for the year that I’ve not reported previously. These came to a total of $81.57. The $241.61 was slightly more than $20 a month on average, which would allow my to take off about one hour each month. My estimated dividend income for the coming year of 2017 is now up to $281.24 in my taxable and IRA accounts that I manage myself. I will not add in the estimated income from the 401(k) account at this point, because I have no idea how much it will be because of variations in the payouts that can be expected from mutual funds. If I estimated the same dividend income from the 401(k) in 2017; however, that would put my forward income at more than $360, or 18 hours when thinking of how much work I would have to replace in a given year at a wage of $20/hour. This is nowhere near enough to pay for my lifestyle, but its much more than the $0 that I was making just 18 short months ago.  I’ve updated my monthly dividend income earnings page to reflect my December earnings.

How was your dividend income in December? Feel free to let me know in the comments.  If you’d like to keep up with my progress, be sure to go to the top of the page and sign up for updates. Also, feel free to follow me on Twitter.  I appreciate any support that you decide to give. Happy New Year.

Disclaimers: Long SBUX, UL, MCD, KO, KHC, SO; I am not a financial professional. Information listed in this post does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell. It is intended for educational and informational purposes only. Equities can increase or decrease in value, and losses up to and including all money invested can occur. Consult with a licensed professional before making an investment decisions. 

November Side Hustle

October 2016 Passive Dividend Income

Well, another month is nearly in the books. We’re now at the end of October, and now less than two months from Christmas. The market has been up and down over the course of the year, but most people have been able to make money if they’ve stayed invested in dividend-paying stocks. This is the type of investment that I’ve decided upon, as these companies actually pay me to own a part of them.

October was a pretty good month for me, going well in excess of my dividend income from the same month last year.  My dividend income should go up over time, but in the short term, it will probably go down a bit, as I’ve decided to sell most of my taxable holdings. I’ll probably explain this further in another post at a future date. I’ve rolled over a tax-deferred account from a previous employ into a traditional IRA, and I will be putting more money toward that in the future year after reading some really good information on tax-deferral from the Mad Fientist’s web site.  You can look at some cool stuff from the Mad Fientist regarding taxes and super charging your retirement portfolio here and here.  Basically, the less that you pay in taxes means more capital for saving for retirement. Therefore, I’m going to shift my focus up a bit and use my taxable account as more of a (hopefully) growing emergency fund that pays out a growing stream of dividends while I wait to need the money while leaving my IRA (and possibly other tax-deferred accounts) to grow until retirement.

Overall, I had four great companies that paid me over the course of October. Three of these should continue to pay me into the future. I trimmed Coca-Cola, but I completely sold out of Bank of Nova Scotia, although it will be on my radar for future purchases in a tax-deferred account. I’ve decided to utilize Loyal3 for my taxable purchases because of the low (i.e., free) transaction costs. I will also up my average purchase through TradeKing, which charges only $4.95 per purchase, to between $500 and $1,000 per transaction to keep the fee below 1%. You can sign up for TradeKing here and possibly get a $50 bonus after meeting some funding and purchasing requirements. I use TradeKing for my non-Loyal3 purchases.

Without stringing you along, here are the great companies that paid me during the month of October. I’ve broken them down by taxable and retirement accounts.

Taxable Accounts

Coca-Cola (KO)                                       $4.19

Kraft-Heinz (KHC)                                $0.34

Bank of Nova Scotia (BNS)               $5.11

Retirement Plan Dividends

General Electric (GE)                            $4.60

TOTAL Dividends for October       $14.24

These dividends bring my total dividend income for 2016 up to $116.17, and my $14.24 for the current month showed a 144 percent growth rate on a year-over-year basis. I should be ahead of this next year at this point again, if all goes as planned and I am able to continue putting more capital to work over time. Because of the stock sales that I noted earlier, my estimated dividend income for the coming year dropped to $130.31, but again, this should go up and exceed where it was as I make periodic purchases within my IRA. I plan to purchase between $500 and $1,000 a month until my transfer amount runs out. If the market crashes and burns before that, I’ll accelerate the purchases, as the best time to purchase stocks is the same as most as just about any other purchase–when they are on sale.

How did your dividend income look in October? Let me know in the comments.

If you’d like to keep up with my dividend income over time, feel free to go to the top of the page and follow me. You’ll only get emails when I actually make a new post, which is usually around five times in a month. In other words, your inbox will not get inundated with random emails.

Disclosure: I am long all stocks mentioned with the exception of BNS, which I sold in October.

Disclaimer: I am not a licensed financial professional. Be sure to do due diligence before investing in securities. This article is not a recommendation to buy a specific company. It is only for educational/entertainment purposes.